NEUROANATOMY: Backwardness of human neuroanatomy

Jim Kohl jkohl at vegas.infi.net
Mon Nov 6 20:57:17 EST 1995


In article <44176.robin073 at maroon.tc.umn.edu>, robin073 at maroon.tc.umn.edu 
says...

>The anatomy of the brain is still not understood in anywhere near 
>the same detail as the rest of the body.   There is even disagreement 
>over the basic anatomical terminology and assignment of functions to 
>different regions of the brain.  E.g. what is the "limbic system"?  
>Every book I've looked in has a different definition.

Until now, I thought I was the only one who had trouble determining which 
structures were included in the limbic system, and was reluctant to show 
my ignorance. (INAH-3, for example--if the whole hypothalamus is 
included)

>There are some pretty elaborate maps now of the interconnections 
>between the different visual areas (at least for monkeys), but they 
>still don't give us much of a clue how vision works.  E.g. where are 
>the patterns of letters held, and how is matching carried out for 
>arbitrary position, brightness, scale, rotation, and style?

The mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal system also 
seems to be fairly well mapped. It's linkage to olfaction is of interest 
to me because of the olfactory-neuroendocrine-behavioral model (social 
environmental chemical stimuli (pheromones) appear to activate genes in 
GnRH neurosecretory neurons, which influences GnRH pulsatility, 
luteinizing hormone/follicle stimulating hormone ratios, steroidogenesis, 
and thus behavior. 

Anyway, is there someone who can help me locate a good source that 
details the location of GnRH neurons in primates as well as which of the 
structures in which they are found can be considered part of the limbic 
system? The location of GnRH receptors would also be a plus in my 
literature review geared towards integrating facets of human chemical 
communication with a psychoneuroendocrine model of behavioral 
development.

Jim Kohl
jkohl at vegas.infi.net




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