multiple sclerosis and monoamines?

MKLeonard mkleonard at aol.com
Fri Dec 27 22:07:06 EST 1996


I posted the following in alt.support.mult-sclerosis.  I believe that
people in this group could offer a more scientific angle to the following
that is applicable to the idea that monoamine levels at synapses
responsible for motor activity may have a role in treating some of the
symptoms invoved in multiple sclerosis:

My friend's father has multiple sclerosis.  He is taking Eldepryl
(selgeline), a drug used in Parkinson's, and swears that it is benefiting
him: mainly he can walk with greater ease and no longer drags his right
leg as much.
       I am a medical student who is doing a pharmacology report.  Rahter
than choose the topics given by the professor, I want to find out how
Eldepryl could help my friend's father.  I do not believe that his
expriences are coincidental remission or placebo effect.
      I would greatly appreciate any responses to the following because I
am hoping that this drug and those with similar action (basically those
that keep monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapse for a longer period
of time) will in the future be proven to benefit some of the symptoms
involved in multiple sclerosis.

1. What are some problems that you experience daily with respect to motor
symptoms: eg. muscle strength, muscle spasms, muscle tone?

2. Have you ever taken mao inhibitors or other medication for depression
and noticed an improvements also in muscle strength, coordinated activity,
less spasms or tone, etc.?

Here is where I am in terms of the paper.  I have found that mao
inhibitors etc. can increase the responsiveness of muscles to voluntary
impulses from the brain.  This seems ideal for those who have trouble
performing voluntary movements (eg. the movements may be slower or with
less strength).  Yet, there are adverse effects related to this activity I
guess.  Your muscles can become overly active and thus one might get
muscle spasms or increased muscle tone and stiffness.  Regardless, I
believe there is something to what my friend's dad has experienced and
would greatly appreciate any input.

Sincerely,
           John



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