Interneural Radio Communication

Ron Blue rcb1 at LEX.LCCC.EDU
Wed Feb 21 09:18:06 EST 1996


On Tue, 20 Feb 1996, headwave wrote:
> 	I honestly believe that brain cells communicate over
> long distances, I mean between brains, via naturally emitted
> radio or microwaves. I am currently attempting to detect such
> emissions as radio spectra.
> 
> 	Does anyone concede that this is possible?
> 
> ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
> Richard L. Nacamuli                             "E per si muove"
> headwave at access.digex.net                                Galileo
> ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
No, I can not honestly say that I do.  If my memory is right the
brain would be about a 15 watt bioequipment. To make a radio wave
you have to have an antenna and modulate a electrical current of
a great deal of amperage.  These two requirement alone destroy your
concept.  For example the brain does not conduct electricity.

Now, if you can use quantum flux in the space time continum, receive
information from the flux and influence the flux maybe.  While I
will not say that the quantum possiblity is non existant, I do believe
the radio model is non-existant.

This should not discourage you.  At least you were thinking about
possibilities sometimes extremely important ideas come from errors
in logic.  Even Einstein made a mistake in his logic and math that
lead to the correct theory of relativity.  If he had not made the
error, it is likely that he would not have looked in the right place.
Ron Blue




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