Ice-cream headaches and carotid sinus thrombosis

Nigel Kenward mbxnjk at vax.nott.ac.uk
Fri Feb 23 04:41:19 EST 1996


> There is disagreement in the anatomical literature on inclusion of the
> maxillary division of trigeminal nerve in the cavernous sinus.  Anatomist
> sometimes consider it part of the floor and not a content.  Clinical signs of
> cavernous sinus thrombosis may include maxillary disturbance.  This
> observation has lead some to include the maxillary division as a content.
> Perhaps the answer lies in terminology rather than structure.  Evenso, I had
> not considered disrupted blood supply (rather than direct neural damage) from
> the internal carotid artery as the cause for involvement of the second
> division.  For that matter, I am not aware of endocrine disturbances from
> erosion of hypophseal arteries.  I suppose one could argue that there are
> adequate anastomotic channels to avert signs (except in bilateral
> involvement).  Helmut?


I like this explanation (and the discussion as a whole).
I'm a biochemist, so forgive the lack of anatomical knowlege, but the recent postings do 
support a fact I have noticed -  that migraine pain and ice-cream headache are VERY similar 
in location and type (tho' not in their extremity and location). I understand that migraine 
is caused by alterations in bloodflow, so a similar change in bloodflow causing ice-cream 
headache would be acceptable as an explanation to me.

Nigel Kenward


BTW - if you're ever in Oxford UK (on a conference etc) check out George and Davis ice 
cream, Little Clarendon St, it's the best in the world (I don't have any links at all with 
them, I just love good ice cream!)



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