"Novelty" gene

Stevejoe stevejoe at qconline.com
Fri Jan 5 03:27:45 EST 1996


In article <v02110102ad1238a7fcc6@[128.151.220.63]>, 
ds005c at UHURA.CC.ROCHESTER.EDU says...

>
>Keep in mind that genes are not simply blueprints that are laid out nicely
>at the start of your life, and then discarded once used.  
>In fact, many advances in the treatment of
>diseases has been helped along by genetics, cancer included.
>

>
>
Yes, I think that genetic research can lead to potenial breakthroughs in 
many areas - one of the most important areas - it seems to me - would be in 
the identification of individuals who are at risk for certain diseases - 
these individuals could then take drastic measures to help to ward off their 
genetically increased risk of disease such as a very low fat diet, etc.

The problem I have with genetic research is that it seems to get the most 
press - and the headlines imply that genetic research will lead to cures for 
all our problems.  I think that this is very misleading to the public.  

I stand by my original statement - I don't see the great results of genetic 
research - not yet, anyway.  Maybe gene-splicing technology will be the 
answer...  Maybe we will be able to repair bad genes in vivo...  We need to 
look for the answer - I just don't think we are going to find it.

And this emphasis on genetic research takes away from other types of 
research.  I think that genetic engineering is the driving force since it 
has the potential for profit making.  Nothing against profit - but let's not 
get enamored with genetic technology.

Stevejoe




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