Interneural Radio Communication

headwave headwave at access5.digex.net
Fri Mar 1 20:07:26 EST 1996


On Thu, 29 Feb 1996, JhOn wrote:

> But aren't we all just little particles of dust, cells, whatever..., just 
> floating around out there waiting to bump into each other.  Isn't this 
> how telepathy works?  I'm not poking fun, I really believe this.  This is 
> also what makes the dreamworld so fascinating.  
> 
> On Tue, 20 Feb 1996, EJ Chichilnisky wrote:
> 
> > In article <Pine.SUN.3.91.960220204116.16336E-100000 at access5.digex.net>,
> > headwave <headwave at access5.digex.net> wrote:
> > 
> >             I honestly believe that brain cells communicate over
> >     long distances, I mean between brains, via naturally emitted
> >     radio or microwaves. I am currently attempting to detect such
> >     emissions as radio spectra.
> >     
> >             Does anyone concede that this is possible?
> >     
> > Concede? Of course it is possible, though no such mechanisms of
> > transmission are known.
> > 
> > Most scientists will listen if you provide some evidence.
> > 
> > -- 
> > EJ Chichilnisky
> > ej at white.stanford.edu
> > 
> > 
> 
> 


	Consider that some cells evolved with the capacity to
communicate via emitted waves. This has already been observed,
technically, in the case of the fire-fly and similar organisms
with organs that emit electromagnetic energy, visible light,
which is detected by organs sensitive to it.
	Could nerve cells have developed a similar ability?
Could nerve cells, instead of emitting visible energy, emit
far-infrared, or microwaves, or radio waves? Could nerve cells
respond to this energy? A general rule that I have, in this
case applied to nature, is that if something can happen, it
will.	I, for one, do not see anything precluding the
existence of interneural radio communication.
	Radio cells? Not proven but not impossible, I think.
We may be "bumping" into each other with invisible beacons
of electromagnetic energy.
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Richard L. Nacamuli                             "E per si muove"
headwave at access.digex.net                                Galileo
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