need list of neurochemicals and their electrical properties

Clint clint2424 at worldnet.att.net
Fri Dec 5 12:35:30 EST 1997


Hannah,

I don't know if this information will help, but below is a list of
neurotransmitters from my Neuroscience Textbook. Let me know if u have any
questions.

1) NEUROTRANSMITTER - ACh
2) POST_SYNAPTIC EFFECT - Excitatory
3) PRECURSOR Choline+acetyl CoA
4) RATE-LIMITING STEP IN SYNTHESIS - CAT	
5) REMOVAL MECHANISM - ACuEase
6) TYPE OF VESICLE - Small/Clrear

1) Glutamate
2) Excitatory
3) Glutamine
4) Glutaminase
5) Transporters
6) Small/Clear

1) GABA
2) Inhibitory
3) Glutamate
4) GAD
5) Transporters
6) Small/Clear

1) Glycine
2) Inhibitory
3) Serine
4) Phosphoserine
5) Transporters
6) Small/Clear

1) Catecholamines
    (i.e. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine)
2) Excitatory
3) Tyrosine
4) Tyrosine Hydroxylase
5) Transporters, MAO, COMT
6) Small, dense core, or large irregular dense-core

1) Serotonin (5-HT)
2) Excitatory
3) Tryptophan
4) Tryptophan Hydroxylase
5) Transporters, MAO
6) Large, Dense Core

1) Histamine
2) Excitatory
3) Histidine
4) Hisitidine Decarboxylase
5) Transporters
6) Large, Dense-core

1) ATP
2) Excitatory
3) ADP
4) Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis
5) Hydrolysis to AMP and adenosine
6) Small Clear

1) Neuropeptides
2) Excitatory
3) Amino Acids (protein synthesis)
4) Synthesis and transport
5) Proteases
6) Large, Dense-core



Hannah Dvorak-Carbone <hdvorak at cns.caltech.edu> wrote in article
<65dam2$4l3 at gap.cco.caltech.edu>...
> In article <65cpdf$5ls at proxye1.maine.rr.com>, writer at maine.rr.com says...
> >
> >I'm writing a work of fiction and have been having difficulty with a bit
of
> >research for the story.
> >
> >Could somebody give me a list (or tell me where to find a list) of the
> >neurochemicals that fire or suppress the firing of neurons as well as
> >measurements of these chemicals' various electrical conductivity
properties.
> 
> Sounds like what you're looking for, if I understand you correctly, is a
list 
> of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.  Neurotransmitters do not

> directly cause neurons to fire (or not fire).  Instead, they activate
(either 
> directly, or indirectly via a biochemical signaling cascade in the
neuron) ion 
> channels in the neuronal cell membrane.  These channels then allow
current to 
> flow across the membrane, either depolarizing the cell (thus bringing it 
> closer to its threshold for firing) or hyperpolarizing it (thus making it
less 
> likely to fire).  (Yes, I know this is an oversimplification.  No flames,

> please!)
> 
> How comprehensive a list do you want?  (And for what organism?  There's
quite 
> a bit of difference between vertebrates and invertebrates.)  In
vertebrates, 
> the major neurotransmitters include glutamate (generally excitatory) and
GABA 
> (generally inhibitory), plus acetylcholine, serotonin, norepinephrine,
etc., 
> all of whose effects vary greatly depending on the type of neuron they're

> acting on.  Then there are all the neuromodulators...
> 
> Any fundamental neuro text can give you more details.
> 
> >(I don't know the medical term (or academic/scientific term) for
"chemical
> >electrical conductivity" so I would appreciate somebody telling me what
that
> >term is as well.)
> 
> I'm not exactly sure what you're looking for.  Perhaps, the conductance
of the 
> ion channels that are activated by the neurotransmitters?
> 
> - Hannah Dvorak-Carbone
> 
> 
> -- 
> --
> Hannah Dvorak-Carbone
> Division of Biology 216-76
> California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125
> 
> 



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