Q: Sleepy leg

Anthonie Muller awjm at holyrood.ed.ac.uk
Wed Jan 29 10:38:30 EST 1997


On Sun, 26 Jan 1997, Wise Young wrote:

> In article <censeb.11.00110060 at natlab.research.philips.com>,
> censeb at natlab.research.philips.com (Barry Cense) wrote:
> 
> >Hi
> >
> >1) What exactly causes the 'sleeping leg' effect? This can happen when your 
> >leg is in a strange position. It feels not so good. Is it because of a stop 
> >of blood supply to the legs or are there some nerves that stop transmitting 
> >(or is it something else)?


> >Barry ense
> 
> Slowing down blood supply to the leg certainly can contribute to a "sleepy"
> leg.  One should not forget, however, that pressure on the sciatic nerve
> can produce the similar effect and may be the more common cause.
[deleted]
>  .. whereas there are several places where the nerve is
> close to the surface and susceptible to compression in the sitting
> position.
[deleted]
  If the leg is warm and pink,
> and particularly if you experience paresthesias (tingling and pain)
> associated trying to walk with the leg, the cause is more likely to be due
> to nerve compression.
> Wise


Very interesting.

But what causes nerve compression?

Am I getting fat?

I like this idea of using the net instead of going to a doctor. Having
worked at a medical and dental institutes (as a biophysicist) I often got
the impression that diagnosing illnesses is mostly straightforward. Can we
not install a doctor-database on the net. 
It would especially be helpful if a list could be made for complaints that
are harmless, or, which are not harmless, but for which no treatment is
possible. 

Cheers

Ton Muller
The Thermosynthesis Home Page
http://www.ed.ac.uk/~awjm




More information about the Neur-sci mailing list