Can demyelinization be a cause of autism?

pspangle at worldnet.att.net pspangle at worldnet.att.net
Sun Sep 28 08:11:48 EST 1997


An excellent review of the neurology of autism can be found in the
preprint article: Neuroanatomical and Neurophysiological Clues to the
Nature of Autism by Matthew Belmonte and Ruth Carper at

http://www.slc.edu/pages/m/mbelmont/Garreau/

According to the article, Autism is related to a low count of Purkinje
cells in the cerebellum, but with an absence of gliosis; i.e. the normal
count of Purkinje cells was never formed in the first place.  It is
theorized that, because signals from fetal Purkinje cells are required
for proper conections in the cortex, the cortex does not develop
properly. (There is much more on other parts of the brain in the article,
so I suggest you read it, as opposed to drawing any conclusions from my
comments.)

Hope this helps.

Patrick Spangler

In article <60hjjf$b1f$1 at newsd-123.bryant.webtv.net>,
  LSHAMROCK at webtv.net wrote:
>
> I am a therapist who is desperately seeking some answers to some
> neurological questions.  I treat pediatric patients and have recently
> started seeing some children with autism.  Interestingly enough, I
> treated a child with demyelinization disorder and found some astounding
> sensory similarities.  I need to know if the pyramidial tracts are
> encased in myelin.  Could autism be a demyelinization disorder (say like
> Guillian-Barre) only in the pyramidial tracts of children.  Research has
> shown some funky protein combos in the bloodstream-could this simply be
> the biproducts of broken down myelin.  I realize I am a little out of my
> territory-but the thoughts are driving me crazy.  If anyone has any
> thoughts or comments-please let me know. Feel free to e-mail at:
> LSHAMROCK at webtv.net
> Thanks

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