can someone answer my question?

Sir Knowitall spamdecoy.only.real.address.is.fellin at one.net.au
Mon Dec 7 07:32:37 EST 1998


May be I can explain, in a philosophy-finishing way, why?

I would do so not just with a metaphorical reference to a self-knotting rope
in more than our ordinary dimensions, and with a more scientific but still
very loose reference to the branch of mathematics called "knot theory" and
to its relatedness to "String Theory" and "M-Theory" of fundametal physics.

But of course also by way of a psycho-Darwinian approach (and more).

However I will not say more than:

Whatever concepts and logic one uses to describe "What Is going on", it
finally/ultimately boils either down, or "up" (i.e. into maximum generality
or
holism), to "What Is". Preferably.

Why preferably? Because, What Is can be used as a most encompassing
possible, and least constrained (including least naively associated), label
for the forever ephemeral (i.e. forever to our *intellectually carried-out*
efforts to "make sense", "securely grasp", or "reliably understand")
self-patterning
essence of every thing and 'no_thing'.

This kind of effort (like so many other of our preoccupations) is something
that we tend to make for conditioned-in more or less chronically
motivational reasons, some very important ones of which we are normally and
usually blissfully ignorant.



Ray Scanlon wrote in message <36689647.0 at ns2.wsg.net>...
>
>psychofunkster wrote in message ...
>>can someone tell me how self-awareness(or conscience) arises in any
>>given organism?
>>more specifically, what are the theories concerning how the brain, with
>>all its component parts (neurons, glial cells, etc.), organizes itself
>>to become one? how does concience arise from such organization?
>
>
>This question has a simple answer. No one, absolutely no one, nowhere, has
>demonstrated how awareness or self-awareness arises in an organism. Nothing
>has been done. No one has ever told how awareness arises. Nothing, nothing,
>nothing.
>
>No one has explained why we are aware of a multitude of neurons as a unity.
>
>Theories are another matter. Anyone may put forth a theory. Theories are a
>dime a dozen.
>
>
>
>





More information about the Neur-sci mailing list