Mechanisms of hearing question

kkollins at pop3.concentric.net kkollins at pop3.concentric.net
Sun Dec 13 20:35:55 EST 1998


Eugene Leitl wrote:
> 
> On 13 Dec 1998, TONYJEFFS wrote:
> 
> The latency has got little to do with temporal resolution. 

It enters, significantly, into spatial localization and behavioral
orientation. ken collins

> It might well
> be that the enhanced resolution is unavailable for short sound bursts. For
> this experimental evidence should be obtainable.
> 
> Regards,
> Eugene Leitl
> 
> > My understanding is that the 'dead' cochlea has a frequency resolution of
> > around 1/2 an octave, and in vivo it is the 'lateral inhibition' provided by
> > the motile outer hair cells (OHCs) that refines this frequency resolution.
> >
> > Now consider the following:
> > IHCs initially detect a sound pressure wave and send the information to the
> > brain. The brain processes this data, and send instructions back to the
> > appropriate OHCs.  The OHCs do their 'fine tuning' work, enabling the
> > appropriate IHCs to accurately identify the frequency of the incoming sound.
> >
> > If that is approximately correct, I see a  problem:-:
> > There would be a delay of the order of milliseconds while (1) the initial
> > information is relayed to appropriate brain nuclei, (2) The information is
> > processed, (3) instructions are sent to the OHCs.
> >
> > Several milliseconds delay seems rather a long time, particularly as I think
> > (?) we can hear sounds of a shorter duration than this.
> >
> > Is my description along the right lines? I suspect I'm missing something!
> > Could  there really such a delay?
> >
> > Thanks
> > Tony
> >
> >
> >



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