The truth is out there

Andrew K Fletcher andrew.k.fletcher at naturesway.demon.co.uk
Mon Dec 14 03:37:56 EST 1998


Dear Frank

your reaction is not a new one to my work, though I did expect better from
you.

Have you repeated my experiment with the tubing? All one would require to do
so is a 4 metre length of aeration tubing from a pet shop that sells fish, a
suitable tray to catch water in, a 2ml syringe and a T joint- optional and
two small necked bottles.

 With the syringe filled with coloured concentrated salt solution attached
to the T joint fixed via a short length of the soft walled tubing, to the
centre of the main tube
Place the water filled open ends of the tubes in the water filled bottles
taking care not to get bubbles in the water.

Then raise the centre of the tube vertically and suspend from a hook or
whatever is available, so that the syringe is attached to the side which is
lower.

Top up the bottles to the brim with more water.

Mop up any water spilled.

Inject a small amount of the coloured salt solution into the suspended loop
of tubing.

Result
The saline solution obviously flows down one side of the tubing.
The other side of the tubing causes water to be drawn from one bottle to the
other, indicated by one overflowing bottle and one falling water level in
the other bottle.

Top up the falling water level side regularly and once circulation has
slowed, indicated by the arrival of the coloured salt solution in the
receiving bottle, re=inject a little more saline solution. Repeat until
syringe is empty.

Then measure the displaced water.

Once you have performed this ridiculously simple experiment, perhaps you
would like to revise your previous comment.

Alternatively, send me an Email, asking for the HTML version and I will
gladly post it to you. I have adopted this approach because I want to keep
track of everyone who become interested in my work.


The reason that gravity is of importance to the restoration of a damaged
nervous system will be dealt with in due course.

Osmosis, Capillary action and root pressure are erroneous  explanations in
relation to fluid transport within trees and plants and animals, including
humans. To defend such explanations, blindly merely lowers ones stature in
the face of undeniable evidence.

I do hope we become friends along this somewhat lonely road?




F. Frank LeFever wrote in message <751qem$lci at sjx-ixn10.ix.netcom.com>...
>
>Nice that each has found someone who "understands".
>Let us hope they email each other directly, incessantly.
>
>Maybe someone should fund a think-tank for these great minds--with
>padded walls?  We have a couple of other candidates, absent from this
>group (mercifully) for a while, but not forgotten...
>
>F. LeFever
>
>
>
>In <913570714.12075.0.nnrp-06.d4e44203 at news.demon.co.uk> "Andrew K
>Fletcher" <andrew.k.fletcher at naturesway.demon.co.uk> writes:
>>
>>Thanks for your kind review Ken






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