Please HELP. Need info

William Wetzels Bill at wwet.demon.nl
Sat Jan 31 17:47:09 EST 1998


Many thanks for your info John. Appreciate it.
I`m sorry I do not know (and cannot find either) the English word for "hersenstam", but
"hersen" means the brain and "stam" would be trunk in English. Maybe this is helpful.
Anyway, doctors here are looking for possibilities for weeks now but no result so far,
reason for me to look around and gather all the info I can get.

Thanks again and kind regards,

William.
On Thu, 29 Jan 1998 17:56:28 -0600, "John H. Casada" <casada at uthscsa.edu> wrote:

>William Wetzels wrote:
>
>> A few weeks ago, my wife (47), after some MRI-scans, got the following diagnosis (sorry,
>> it is in Durch, but I`m sure the professionals will understand):
>> 
>>                 CARVENEUS  HEMANGIOOM
>
>You are probably referring to a cavernous hemangioma.
>
>> 
>> This tumor should be located in the " hersenstam" ( my encyclopedia  tells me that the
>> latin term is " Truncus Cerebri".
>
>It is hard to tell exactly where you are referring to.  This is very
>important for the questions you ask later.
>
>
>>  My questions:
>> 
>> - What is it exactly? What does it do?
>
>A cavernous hemangioma is a mass of enlarged blood vessels.  It takes up
>space in the brain tissue and disrupts their normal functioning.
>
>> - What will happen if nothing will be done?
>
>It is hard to say.  If nothing is none, the symptoms would not likely
>get better.  Also, because these are enlarged blood vessels, bleeding
>could occur.
>
>> - What can be done?
>
>I am only familiar with neurosurgical removal as a treatment for this. 
>Still, it is not my specialty.
>
>> - What are the risks?
>> - What are the chances?
>> - Is there a chance she will be able to live a normal live again?
>
>All of these questions depend on the size and location of the hemangioma
>as well as other aspects of your wife's health.  Your doctors there
>would be better judges of that.
>
>> - Are there any specialists who could deal with this problem and could help her?
>
>As I said earlier, neurosurgeons would be the most likely help.
>
>Some of these can be removed with little problem and few residual
>symptoms. I know you are concerned, but the best judges of your wife's
>condition and prognosis are the doctors taking care of her.
>
>Good luck to you and your wife.
>John




More information about the Neur-sci mailing list