neuron energy use

kkollins at pop3.concentric.net kkollins at pop3.concentric.net
Wed Oct 28 20:50:06 EST 1998


Please don't loose sight of the fact that the original energy-throughput Q is an
important one. If it seems not to be so, it's "just" be-cause the brain is
extremely-good at keeping it under control... which, when one looks, is seen to
be a gloriously-large clue to all of brain function. In looking at the brain,
the most-important stuff, as far as the brain, itself, is concerned,  is the
most-"invisible" stuff. The "invisibility" is a measure of how well the brain
(nervous system) is "engineered" to handle a particular problem. Get it? That
which is "invisible" is right-there visible when we look at it, but the "lens"
through which it can be seen is Thermodynamics.

The cross-correlated inhibition of which you wrote is, of course, of =great=
significance within the larger mechanism (within the global
information-processing dynamics), but we have to see why it's so. Cheers, Ron,
ken

RonBlue wrote:

> > There are refractory periods, but these are due to 'inactivation' of
> >voltage-gated sodium channels (and to some extent, K+ efflux, but that
> >supposedly is more significant in the squid axons where this was figured
> >out than it is in myelinated human ones), not the neuron running out of
> >energy.
> >>>>>>
> good point.   Also associational reciprocal inhibition can block a firing of
> a particular neuron.
> Ron Blue






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