JOBS IN NEUROSC????

Stephan stephan at ucla.edu
Wed Sep 9 03:54:10 EST 1998


You also left out the highest paying job, which is to do management
consulting as a specialty consultant in pharmaceuticals and health-care. I
mean if you are going to sell out, you might as well sell out big time. 
Many of the bigger management consulting firms are highering PhD
scientists nowadays, especially McKinsey...

Anyway, Neurobiology is a big field, and it depends on exactly the kind of
research she is doing as to what jobs may be available.  Some stuff is
more fundable than others; some kinds of work (e.g., genetics) have better
tie-ins to industry and others don't.  Likewise, somethings are hot and
you need to be in the right place at the right time to be able to land a
good faculty position as well.

In article <6t3nn0$75n$1 at due.unit.no>, STUMOL at stud.ntnu.no (Sturla Molden)
wrote:

> In article
<libbyhigh-0709981747120001 at 88.ft-worth-02.tx.dial-access.att.net>, "Libby
(Winegar) High" <libbyhigh at worldnet.att.net> wrote:
> >My daughter is majoring in neurobiology in college. (She says she is
> >fascinated by the brain). What career opportunities are available besides
> >research? Would like to at least know what's in her future.
> 
> It soulds like you are outraged. First I want to say that you ask the wrong
> question. One does not know exactly what careers are open to scientists.
> If  your daugher had studied nursing she would have become a nurse; if she
> had studied law she would have become a cilisitor. But science is different,
> there is no correct answer to the question "what do you become then?" 
> Here are some examples of carrers I  know are available to neurobiologists:
> 
> - Several types of work for the pharmaceutical industry (management,
> develpment, research, product testing, marketing, etc.) This is probably were 
> you find the biggest salaries. 
> 
> - Health care (many differents types of laboratory work)
> 
> - Natural management or concervation (they emply any biologist) 
> 
> - The armed forces: almost all chemical or biological weapons attack the 
> nervous system. The armed forces have traditionally been one of the largest 
> employers for neurobiologists. If your daughter is lucky she gets to
work with 
> harmless compounds like sarin,  VX gas, or botulinum toxine.
> 
> - Agricultural management, e.g. pest control (the best way to fight
nasty bugs 
> like the colorado beetle  is to fool its chemosensory organ) and applied 
> ethology (ensuring animal welfare and enhancing production). 
> 
> - Chemical industry, e.g. work relating assament of som environmental 
> pollutants.
> 
> - Teaching (everything from highschools to universities)   
> 
> - Research: most of those who study neurobiology do so to get a reasearch 
> posistion. They are seldom well payed, but probably the most interesting 
> careers awailable. Neuroscience is one of the fastest growing fields of 
> biomedical research, so there are a number of research positions awailable. 
> 
> - Product develpoment for companies with interests in animal robotics,
> artifical intelligence, neural networks, etc.
> 
> - Some universities have programs in experimental psychology for people with 
> initial training in (neuro)biology, e.g. University of Sussex (see 
> www.sussex.ac.uk). This opens many careers primarily awailable for 
> psychologists.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sturla Molden
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --
> Sturla Molden
> stumol at stud.ntnu.no



More information about the Neur-sci mailing list