pathology of epilepsy

RonBlue rcb5 at MSN.COM
Mon Sep 21 21:59:46 EST 1998


>-----Original Message-----
>From: F. Frank LeFever <flefever at ix.netcom.com>
>To: neur-sci at net.bio.net <neur-sci at net.bio.net>
>Date: Saturday, September 19, 1998 11:27 AM
>Subject: Re: pathology of epilepsy


>I appreciate Matt's elaboration, and his referencer to Kapur &
>MacDonald, which I intend to look into: my own special interest is in
>long-term consequences of MILD head injury, which raises seizure risk
>only very slightly, compared to severe injury.  Interestingly, data
>I've seen suggest a dichotomy rather than smooth "dose-response"
>progression: i.e., not much difference between "mild" and "moderate" in
>this regard, but big difference between them and "severe".  Possibly
>just an artifact of classification rules, but maybe---??  Any ideas?
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>cut>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
One study suggested that seisures occurred when EEG reading between
both lobe were perfectly equal.   Since this violates Correlational Opponent
Processing I do not understand this.

F. Frank LeFever reported a relationship between brain damage and epilepsy.

In Correlational Opponent Processing the goal is to create balance with
in coming stimulation by forming anti-wavelet memory to that stimulation.
When the brain is perfectly balanced with EEG reading it would suggest
that it has accomplished this goal.   LeFever's post suggest to me
another possibility.  What is observerable does not necessarily reveal
the underlining dynamics.   When we stare at the color green, the brain
is in balance after a few minutes and has habituated to the stimulus.
However, when the stimulus is removed a strong rebound or opponent
reaction occurs resulting in perceiving red.   Now lets apply this
to epilepsy.   Brain damage would have created problems
in the neuological wiring.   When the EEG readings are perfect it suggest
the brain has learned to handle that problem.   A strong rebound effect
or opponent reaction as a new (red) stimulus comes in, could be enough to
cause a seisure.

Ron Blue









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