Time Magazine: Man of the Millennium

Maynard Handley handleym at ricochet.net
Tue Sep 22 09:48:51 EST 1998


In article <3606B2DA.9F74ECB0 at primenet.com>, Jack Andrews
<amiga at primenet.com> wrote:

> > My opinion only
> 
> For starters we can consider American History (for starters)
> 
> I suggest you do some reading on the subject, and alter your bigoted
sexist views.
> 

And you think 
> Alcott, Louisa May (1832-1888) - Seamstress, servant, teacher, Civil War
nurse, and
> finally, author and novelist
or 
> Marian Anderson (1902-1995) - First African American to sing leading role with
> Metropolitan Opera, delegate to U.N.
or
> Sarah Bolton (1841-1916) - Noted Cleveland author of biographies, poetry and a
> temperance novel

changed history as much say Alfred Sloan or Cyrus McCormick or Edison or Bell?
Give me a break.
Jesus, I did not NOT say every woman in history sat at home and cooked. 
I said that the big things that changed everyone's lives over the last one
thousand years were for the most part caused by white European (and in the
last 1/4 of those thousand years North American) males. 

No disrepect to the women below, but I think the list proves my point.
I mean, for crying out loud. We're talking here about things like founding
the UN and you offer up "delegate to the UN". We're talking domestication
of electro-magnetic radiation and you offer up "lighthouse keeper".

Maynard


> 
> Abigail Adams (1744-1818) - Wife of President John Q. Adams, advocate of
women's
> rights
> Alcott, Louisa May (1832-1888) - Seamstress, servant, teacher, Civil War
nurse, and
> finally, author and novelist
> Marian Anderson (1902-1995) - First African American to sing leading role with
> Metropolitan Opera, delegate to U.N.
> Susan Brownell Anthony (1820-1906) - Napoleon of the women's suffrage
movement,
> mother of the 19th Amendment, abolitionist
> Josephine Baker (1906-1975) - African-American international star, civil
rights
> activist, World War II heroine
> Ida B. Wells Barnett (1869-1931) - African-American educator, newspaperwoman,
> anti-lynching campaigner, founder NAACP
> Clara Barton (1821-1912) - Civil War nurse, founder of the American Red Cross
> Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) African-American educator, founder of
> Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona Beach, Florida,
> Presidential advisor, recipient of Spingarn Medal
> Sarah Bolton (1841-1916) - Noted Cleveland author of biographies, poetry and a
> temperance novel
> Mary Elizabeth Bowser ( 1839-?) - African-American Union spy in the
Confederate
> White House
> Belle Boyd (1844-1900) - Confederate spy during the Civil War
> Eliza Bryant (1827-1907) - African-American founder of the The Cleveland
Home for
> Aged Colored People
> Martha Jane "Calamity Jane" Canary (1852-1903) - A lone woman in the
wilds of the
> Rocky Mountain west
> Rachel Carson (1907-1964) - Marine biologist, science writer, and
environmentalist
> Rebecca Carter (1766-1827) - Pioneer woman of Cleveland
> Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) - Suffragette, founder of the League of Women
> Voters
> Cassie L. Chadwick (1857-1907) - Most infamous Cleveland financial con-artist
> Bessie Coleman (1893-1926) - First African-American woman to get pilot's
license
> Dorothy Dandridge (1923-1965) - Actress, singer and dancer. Star of
Carmen Jones
> and Porgy and Bess
> Isadora Duncan (1875-1929) - Mother of modern dance
> Amelia Earhart (1897-1913) - Aviatrix
> Mary Fields (1832?-1914) - African-American entrepreneur, stagecoach driver,
> pioneer
> Diana Fletcher (circa 1830's) - Daughter of a former slave and Kiowa mother,
> activist, taught in black Cherokee school
> Zelma Watson George (1903-1994) - African-American delegate to the U.N., opera
> singer, speaker and educator
> Abbie Burgess Grant (1839-1892) - Lighthouse keeper at Matinicus Rock
and Whitehead
> Light Stations in Maine, commissioned by U.S. Coast Guard
> Charlotte Forten Grimke (1837-1890) - African-American writer,
abolitionist and
> educator
> Sally Hemmings (1773-1835) - African American who sacrificed her freedom from
> slavery for the love of President Thomas Jefferson
> Adella Prentiss Hughes (1869-1950) - Founder of the Cleveland Orchestra and
> Cleveland Music Settlement House
> Jane Edna Hunter (1882-1971) - African-American social worker, attorney,
founder of
> Phyllis Wheatley Association of Cleveland
> Zora Neale Hurston (1903-1960) - African-American writer from The Harlem
Group,
> influenced Toni Morrison and Alice Walker
> Harriet Jacobs (1813-1897) - African-American escaped slave, author and
> abolitionist
> Rebecca Jackson ( ??) - African-American eldress of the Shaker sect in
Cleveland
> Sisseretta Jones (1869-1933) - African-American international vocal
prima donna of
> late 19th century, favorite of George Bernard Shaw and several presidents
> Elizabeth Keckley (1820-?) Personal maid, best friend and confidant to
Mary Todd
> Lincoln. Wrote tell-all book after leaving Mrs. Lincoln's employ
> Marie LaVeau (1796?-1863?) - African-American Voodoo Queen of New Orleans and
> famous herbalist
> Edmonia Lewis ( 1843-?) - First successful African-American sculptor
> Ida Lewis (1842-1913) - Heroic lighthouse keeper of Rhode Island,
commissioned by
> U.S. Coast Guard
> Mary Todd Lincoln (1818-1882) - Wife of President Abraham Lincoln,
misrepresented
> by popular history and maligned by her peers
> Jenny Lind (1820-1887) - Swedish international opera star, brought to
U.S. by P.T.
> Barnum during Civil War
> Juliette Gordon Low (1860-1927) - Founder of the American Girl Scouts
> Clare Booth Luce (1903-1987) - Playwright, U.S. Congresswoman and
ambassador to
> Italy
> Dolley Madison (1772-1849) - First Lady and doyen of Washington society
> Biddy Mason (1818-1891) - Entrepreneur, one of first African-American
women to own
> land in California
> Flora Stone Mather (1852-1910) - Cleveland philanthropist, founder of
Flora Stone
> Mather college at Western Reserve University for women; sponsored
Goodrich House
> for urban children
> Susan McKinley (1848-1918) - First female African American doctor in New
York State
> 
> Maria Mitchell (1818-1889) - Astronomer and first female professor of Vassar
> College; inventor of marine navigational equipment
> Annie Oakley (1860-1926) - World famous markswoman from Ohio Georgia O'Keeffe
> (1887-1986) - Famed American artist who defied convention in both her
art and her
> private life
> Mrs. George (Hannah?) Peake (1755-18??) - First African-American settler of
> Cleveland
> Eleanor Anna Roosevelt (1884-1962) - Wife of President Franklin D.
Roosevelt, first
> activist First Lady
> Rebecca Rouse (1799-1887) - Cleveland humanitarian, temperance advocate,
> abolitionist, founder of Beech Brook
> Wilma Rudolph (1940-1994) - African-American Olympic Gold Medalist
> Bessie Smith (1894-1937) - African-American blues singer
> Valaida Snow (1900-1956) - African-American band leader and trumpet player
> Belle Sherwin (1868-1955) - Cleveland suffragist, President of League of Women
> Voters, social reformer
> Belle Starr (1848-1889) - Confederate sympathizer and western
frontierswoman and
> outlaw
> Susie King Taylor (1848-1912) - First African-American U.S. Army nurse
during the
> Civil War
> Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) - African-American lecturer,
suffragette, civil
> rights leader
> Sojourner Truth (Isabella Baumfree) (1797-1883) - African-American
abolitionist and
> Civil War nurse, suffragette Harriet Tubman (1820?-1913) - Underground
Railroad
> conductor, Army scout, African-American suffragette
> Rosetta Wakeman (1843-1864) - Posed as a male to serve in Union Army
during Civil
> War
> Madame C.J. Walker (1867-1919) - African-American entrepreneur,
millionaire and
> philanthropist
> Hazel Mountain Walker (1900-1980) - African-American attorney,
principal, actress
> at Karamu
> Katherine Walker (1846-1931) - Lighthouse keeper at Robin's Reef, New York,
> commissioned by U. S. Coast Guard
> Phyllis Wheatley (1754-1785) - Mother of African-American women's
literature, poet
> 
> 
> --
> Jack Andrews
> http://www.primenet.com/~amiga Original Art
> 
> http://members.tripod.com/~artist_3/ Original VRML Art
> 
> http://www.primenet.com/~amiga/chronicpain1.html
> Our Lives With Chronic Pain
> (please contribute your "thoughts" to this site)
> 
> Let not the fierce sun dry one tear of pain before thyself
> hast wiped it from the sufferer's eye.
> H. P. Blavatsky (1831-1891)

-- 
My opinion only



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