Time Magazine: Man of the Millennium

Paul Gowder pgowder at law.harvard.edu
Mon Sep 28 22:30:01 EST 1998


in <b.evill-2909980744170001 at tynslip1.apana.org.au>,  b.evill at spamblocker.tyndale.apana.org.au (Brett Evill) did something allowing me to incorporate a very witty verb in this line and produced:
>In article <6uom0v$dv7$1 at news.fas.harvard.edu>, pgowder at law.harvard.edu
>(Paul Gowder) wrote:
>
>>in <b.evill-2809981244530001 at tynslip4.apana.org.au>, 
>b.evill at spamblocker.tyndale.apana.org.au (Brett Evill) did something
>allowing me to incorporate a very witty verb in this line and produced:
>
>>>As influential as 'In Praise of the New Knighthood'? As influential as the
>>>'Confessions' of Augustine of Hippo? As the Bible? The Koran? Newton's
>>>'Principia'?, Harvey's 'On the Ciculation of the Blood'? Galileo's "The
>>>Revolution of the Celestial Orbs"? 'The Origin of Species'? Marx's
>>>"Capital"? Smith's "The Wealth of Nations"? These have profoundly
>>>influenced people even beyond the confines of the languages they were
>>>originally written in.
>>
>>
>>You forgot The Prince.  (my favorite book) 
>
>I also left out 'The Golden Bough', 'The Interpretation of Dreams',
>Einstein's papers on Relativity, Mao's Little Red Book, Keynes' 'General
>Theory of Money, Interest, and Unemployment', Cranmer's 'Book of Common
>Prayer', and dozens of others. I got tired.
>

No need for sarcasm.  Prince had a much wider influence than any of 
those books mentioned in the second paragraph, and arguably more than 
several in the first (Wealth of Nations, On the Circulation of Blood, 
etc.)

-P



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