Grandmother Pain Cells?

Cijadrachon cijadra at zedat.fu-berlin.de
Mon May 24 10:56:24 EST 1999


(...Guess not.)

>Neuroscientists have homed in on the nerve cells in the seat of our
>consciousness 
In other words they have not or they'd know that there are several
areas conscious, and that front cingulate is not.
Apart from that I do not need to torture other mammals in order to
know that the playground can perceive pain.
How difficult is it to pop a trip, cup your hands behind your ears
till you manage to perceive stereo reflected just there and not
longeer from the boxes, and then go closer to the head with the hands
while the eyes are closed and aim the stuff into cingulate and paly
around in there including with pain perception stuff?

One could believe some live behind the moon and have not gotten some
of the most simple tripping arts yet.

Next they are going to abuse other mammals to pronounce that sorts of
epileptic overloads can be triggered there as well, or what.

(BTW, THAT hurts the way that I believe some of the cells there croak
if it goes too far.)

>Animal experiments in the '80s found that the anterior cingulate
>cortex (ACC), a region in the frontal cortex, is involved in pain
>perception. Brain imaging techniques in humans confirmed this role in pain
>processing, but cannot provide the kind of resolution to pinpoint how
>individual cells react to sensations.

Seemed more clusters of them to me reacting fairly togetherish.

>Seizing a rare chance to delve deeply into the ACC's inner workings,
>neuroscientist Bill Hutchison of the University of Toronto teamed up with
>neurosurgeons to study patients who undergo a 

>last-resort 
for the people seeking lies for false self-justifications

>treatment for very severe cases of depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. 
And what do you notice if you observe your brain for those?
You are not seriously going to state that the front of the cingulate
gyrus is initiating generalized obsessive-compulsive disorders,
apart from that from the own cholinergic limbic sytems even some of
MBDs tend to have hell of a targetting and hardware alteration power
into the playground.
Maybe at some point neuro could get it that one is an energy selector
and that in the playground wave data is displayed, and that of course
as central energy selector one has hell of an alteration power there.

(Gnagnagna... But I guess it is too hard 
for justifications why to abuse persons of other mammal races 
to get why Alzheimer is so bad for the own I, 
and to take a neuro brain map and watch how many connections there are
from the own cholinergic limbic areas into the regions
forwards-upwards in the playground.)

>The procedure
Procedure, aha. I'd call it crippling.
>involves drilling a tiny hole in the skull and severing a bundle of nerve
>fibers connecting the ACC, involved in these disorders, to other regions.
Are they nuts?!

>      Hutchison placed an ultra-thin electrode in the ACC of 11 patients by
>slipping it into their skull boreholes before the nerve fibers were cut. He
>applied various stimuli to the patients' hands, such as heat, cold, or
>sticking a needle in their fingers, and, while measuring the activity of
>individual ACC cells, asked them what they felt. Of 392 nerve cells
>monitored, he found 11--in four patients--that responded exclusively to
>pain. Some of these cells responded to pain from several stimuli, while
>others responded only to specific painful sensations. This high specificity
>suggests that the ACC is a central pain processing unit, says Hutchison.

Lete me guess, and next he is getting that there is wave data from
different areas relayed there, and that one can steer into there from
cholinergic limbic systems, and that one can cause reactions up to
hardware changes there.

>      He also found three nerve cells that fired when the patients were
>bracing for a pain stimulus, or when they saw the researchers inflict pain
>upon themselves. This could be a cellular explanation for the saying "I feel
>your pain," says Hutchison. "These aren't simply pain signaling cells," he
>says, "they're much more sophisticated than just giving you an 'Ouch!'
>response." 

Man, after several thousand years of telepathy who would have thought
so.

The millenium neuro is getting LSD high arts, you folks might even be
proud to announce that then sending in certain ways from the own areas
into your irxtlwrrkses for the playground till you get it to a certain
optics setting nd then tune out into the magic training partner's
cingulate gyrus you land in front of the others door and get one of
the magically neatest function perceptions of the others own I from
"docking in front of his own doors".  But I guess till that likely
remote millenium some will remain at playing stupid so they can go on
abusing persons of other mammal races, keep them prisoner, eat meat,
take space of others in unfair ways so the own race has more 
and so on.

>The findings are "wonderful," says Catherine Bushnell, a
>neurobiologist at McGill University in Montreal. The ACC, she says, "is
>probably very important in telling us how to respond to pain, whether to
>flight or to fight."

Not that I know of.

The fifth emotion generator or what you irxtlwrrks the adrenal glands
tends to kick out stuff, and when that smurfs into the third emotion
generator in the head that one reacts, and also there seems to be
loads of old programs branching in and out from there, some of them
registering as among the oldest that even came in front of my internal
scanners in my brainsurfer times, and if I were to run a search
program I'd vulture around in third and there, though those seemed to
be a bit remote and sort of nearly out of range.
Or maybe they were there historically so long before me now in my
functions, that this is why the relays between us are not smurfing
that well.


("John's Relentless Target Picker",
liking to stay vague on most of that. ;-)



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