Thinking without language?

Sir Knowitall fell_followedby_in at one.net.au
Sat Nov 27 14:09:57 EST 1999


Greg Lee <lee at Hawaii.edu> wrote in message
news:81m4ck$b0s$3 at news.hawaii.edu...
> In sci.lang \"Sir Knowitall\" <fell_followedby_in at one.net.au> wrote:
>
> ...
>
> : It is, I maintain, impossible to be equally aware at the same time
(really
> : focused and vividly conscious of two activities of two
"hardware"-absorbing
> : activites) of any two distinctly different sensory-motor contents of/at
> ...
>
> Why do you seem to yourself to be a single person instead of many?
Possible
> answer: you can only recall being vividly conscious of one thing at a time
> (even though you might have actually been conscious of several).  I think
> you should consider the possibility that people really differ in how
> they can divide their consciousness and how well they can
> recollect doing so.

We probably don't define/mean consciousness the same way.

By the way, (re the subject of this thread) it is possible to think
lingually more or less well (as in beneficially in some way, efficiently,
encompassingly, etc.).

Peter F








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