Irresistible impulses

F. Frank LeFever flefever at ix.netcom.com
Fri Sep 10 22:40:00 EST 1999



One way to think of this is to compare it to the "need" one has to
scratch "an itch"; it CAN be resisted, but with great difficulty and
discomfort.

I believe it was in the context of OCD that someone wrote (one of the
neurological journals, maybe 1-2 years ago? 2-3 years ago??) about a
somewhat neglected aspect (perhaps drawing on self-reports?): not the
need to DO something, but the need to have the "right" feeling, "right"
thought, etc. (a mental itch that needs scratching?).


F. Frank LeFever, Ph.D.
New York Neuropsychology Group 



In <936853902.360026 at server.australia.net.au> "John"
<johnhkm at netsprintXXXX.net.au> writes: 
>
>From New Scientist, 11 September 1999
>
>Irresistible impulses
>
>Matt Walker
>
>PEOPLE WHO SWEAR and twitch because they have Tourette's syndrome are
more
>in control of their actions than anyone realised. A psychologist in
Canada
>has found the first direct evidence that their tics are intentional,
>coordinated movements made in response to some irresistible urge,
rather
>than involuntary spasms.
>
>The symptoms of Tourette's range from excessive twitching to extreme
bouts
>of inappropriate swearing. Doctors have assumed that the tics and
verbal
>outbursts are involuntary, says Randy Flanagan of Queen's University
in
>Kingston, Ontario.
>
>
>--
>Flanagan believes this is evidence that Tourette's is not a simple
motor
>disorder but a higher-level problem. He thinks it is like obsessive
>compulsive disorders, which affect the circuits of the brain's
premotor
>frontal lobe and basal ganglia--areas that control planning and
decision
>making.
>
>
>--
>http://www.newscientist.com/ns/19990911/newsstory9.html
>--
>From New Scientist, 11 September 1999
>
>
>--
>
>
>--
>John
>Remove XXXX in reply address
>
>




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