Intelligence g Factor/Jensen: PSYC Call for Multiple Book Reviewers

Stevan Harnad harnad at cogito.ecs.soton.ac.uk
Wed Sep 15 21:22:11 EST 1999


                PSYCOLOQUY CALL FOR BOOK REVIEWERS

Below is the Abstract of the Precis of "The g Factor" by Arthur Jensen.

This book has been selected for multiple review in PSYCOLOQUY. If you
wish to submit a formal book review please write to
psyc at pucc.princeton.edu indicating what expertise you would bring to
bear on reviewing the book if you were selected to review it.

(If you have never reviewed for PSYCOLOQUY or Behavioral & Brain
Sciences before, it would be helpful if you could also append a copy of
your CV to your inquiry.) If you are selected as one of the reviewers
and do not have a copy of the book, you will be sent a copy of the book
directly by the publisher (please let us know if you have a copy
already). Reviews may also be submitted without invitation, but all
reviews will be refereed. The author will reply to all accepted
reviews.

The Full Precis of the book is available at these URLs (bot note that
the Reviews are to be of the BOOK, not the Precis: :

    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/cgi/psyc/newpsy?10.023
or
    ftp://ftp.princeton.edu/pub/harnad/Psycoloquy/1999.volume.10/
    psyc.99.10.023.intelligence-g-factor.1.jensen

Full Psycoloquy book review instructions at:

    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/

Relevant excerpts:

    Psycoloquy reviews are of the book not the Precis. Length should be
    about 200 lines [c. 1800 words], with a short abstract (about 50
    words), an indexable title, and reviewer's full name and
    institutional address, email and Home Page URL. All references that
    are electronically accessible should also have URLs.

                AUTHOR'S RATIONALE FOR SOLICITING COMMENTARY

The g factor arises from the empirical fact that scores on a large
variety of independently designed tests of extremely diverse cognitive
abilities all turn out to be positively correlated with one another.
The g factor appears to be a biological property of the brain, highly
correlated with measures of information-processing efficiency, such as
working memory capacity, choice and discrimination reaction times, and
perceptual speed. It is highly heritable and has many biological
correlates, including brain size, evoked potentials, nerve conduction
velocity, and cerebral glucose metabolic rate during cognitive
activity. It remains to investigate and explain its neurobiological
basis. Commentary is invited from psychometricians, statisticians,
geneticists, neuropsychologists, psychophysiologists, cognitive
modellers, evolutionary psychologists and other specialties concerned
with cognitive abilities, their measurement, and their cognitive and
neurobiological basis.

psycoloquy.023.intelligence-g-factor.1.jensen           Wed Sep 15 1999
ISSN 1055-0143                (70 paragraphs, 12 references, 905 lines)
PSYCOLOQUY is sponsored by the American Psychological Association (APA)
                Copyright 1999 Arthur Jensen

                Precis of :
                THE G FACTOR: THE SCIENCE OF MENTAL ABILITY
    [Praeger, 1998 xiv + 648 pp. ISBN 0-275-96103-6 ISSN 1063-2158]

                Arthur R. Jensen
                Graduate School of Education
                University of California, Berkeley
                Nesnejar at aol.com

    ABSTRACT: The g factor is the highest-order common factor that can
    be extracted in a hierarchical factor analysis from a large battery
    of diverse tests of various cognitive abilities. It is the most
    important psychometric construct in the study of individual
    differences in human cognitive abilities. Since its discovery by
    Spearman in 1904, the g factor has become so firmly established as
    a major psychological construct in terms of psychometric and factor
    analytic criteria that further research along these lines is very
    unlikely either to disconfirm the construct validity of g or to add
    anything essentially new to our understanding of it. In fact, g,
    unlike any of the primary, or first-order, factors revealed by
    factor analysis, cannot be described in terms of the knowledge
    content of cognitive test items, or in terms of skills, or even in
    terms of theoretical cognitive processes. It is not essentially a
    psychological or behavioral variable, but a biological one, a
    property of the brain. But although not itself a cognitive ability,
    g is what causes positive correlations among individual differences
    in performance, even on cognitive tasks that differ greatly with
    respect to sensory motor modality, brain modularity, and learned
    cognitive skills and knowledge. The g factor derived from
    conventional nonspeeded psychometric tests shows higher
    correlations than any other factors independent of g with various
    measures of information-processing efficiency, such as working
    memory capacity, choice and discrimination reaction times, and
    perceptual speed. A test's g loading is the best predictor of its
    heritability and its sensitivity to inbreeding depression.
    Psychometric g also has more direct biological correlates than any
    other independent source of test variance, for example brain size,
    brain evoked potentials, nerve conduction velocity, and the brain's
    glucose metabolic rate during cognitive activity. The ultimate
    arbiter among various "theories of intelligence" must be the
    physical properties of the brain itself. The current frontier of g
    research is the investigation of the anatomical and physiological
    features of the brain that cause g. Research has reached the point
    at which the only direction left in which to go is that presaged by
    Spearman himself, who wrote that the final understanding of g must
    "come from the most profound and detailed direct study of the human
    brain in its purely physical and chemical aspects" (1927, p.403).

    KEYWORDS: behavior genetics, cognitive modelling, evoked
    potentials, evolutionary psychology, factor analysis, g factor,
    heritability, individual differences, intelligence, IQ,
    neurometrics, psychometrics, psychophyiology, skills, Spearman,
    statistics

The Full Precis of the book is available at these URLs (bot note that
the Reviews are to be of the BOOK, not the Precis: :

    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/cgi/psyc/newpsy?10.023
or
    ftp://ftp.princeton.edu/pub/harnad/Psycoloquy/1999.volume.10/
    psyc.99.10.023.intelligence-g-factor.1.jensen

Full Psycoloquy book review instructions at:

    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/

Relevant excerpts:

    Psycoloquy reviews are of the book not the Precis. Length should be
    about 200 lines [c. 1800 words], with a short abstract (about 50
    words), an indexable title, and reviewer's full name and
    institutional address, email and Home Page URL. All references that
    are electronically accessible should also have URLs.




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