Anyone read about that electronic eye chip?

William Stacy wstacy at obase.net
Fri Apr 28 10:23:14 EST 2000


At the top of my Christmas 2000 wish list: Require all browsers to warn of
cross-posting in their reply function. Maybe something subtle, like "Hey, dummy,
are you SURE you want to post esoteric stuff about LISP and PERL on
sci.med.vision, too?

bill
http://www.obase.net

"L.A. Loren" wrote:

> I don't think there's a good answer to that question Peter, at least not
> a short one. LISP was certainly one of the earliest and most influential
> AI languages, but then again in the early days of AI, LISP was also one
> of the few existing languages. If I'm not mistaken it was developed by
> an AI researcher (Minsky?) for AI programming, among other things. Since
> that time, programming languages, and the study of them, has progressed
> significantly. As a result, the choice of what language to use is often
> determined by the task at hand (i.e. for certain combinatorial problems
> you may want to use prolog or LISP), the platform on which it will run
> (perhaps Java if you require platform independence), the temporal
> constraints (C and C++ are much faster than Java) etc. In some circles
> LISP is still widely, or even exclusively, used. Usually this occurs
> where rule-based AI is being developed, although Randall Beer's early
> work on artificial cockroaches was also done in LISP I believe. In other
> circles a variety of languages may be used, in fact different modules
> for the same program might be coded in different languages.
>
> Anyway, whether you are "hopelessly out of date" depends almost entirely
> on who you are talking too and what project you are discussing. OK well,
> I suspect I've blathered on WAAAAaaay to long here.
>
> Take care,
> Lew
>
> PeterS wrote:
> >
> > I thought LISP was the lingua franca  of AI - am I hopelessly out of date?
> >
> > steve at tropheus.demon.co.uk wrote in message ...
> > >On Thu, 27 Apr 2000 16:16:36 -0700, Seth Russell <seth at robustai.net>
> > >wrote:
> > >
> > >>j wrote:
> > >>
> > >>> >Forth is the lingua franca of AI, embedded NC and robotics.
> > >>> >For details on Mind.Forth and the public domain AI project,
> > >>> >see the ACM Sigplan Notices 33(12):25-31 (December 1998),
> > >>> >"Mind.Forth: Thoughts on Artificial Intelligence and Forth."
> > >>>
> > >>>    Too bad that FORTH is such an awful anachronistic
> > >>>    language. Nobody thinks in stacks ...  :-)
> > >>
> > >>Bull shit!  Everybody thinks in stacks.
> > >
> > >Some of the diagrams on your own web site would be very difficult to
> > >reduce to stacked thoughts. Objects and links, not stacks.
> > >
> > >
> > >Steve
> > >--
> > >
> > >Steve Wolstenholme
> > >Neural Network Applications for Windows
> > >http://www.tropheus.demon.co.uk





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