Antipsychiatry, Bioethics & Neuroscience

Bill Skaggs skaggs at bns.pitt.edu
Fri Aug 4 14:56:00 EST 2000


SA <nospam at nospam.net> writes:

> The fact is, people come to psychologists and psychiatrists for help, 
> not the other way around.  Although there are examples of forced 
> drugging, these are not the representative sample...
> 
> Stephan

The fact is, people who suffer from paranoid schizophrenia rarely
choose of their own free will to be drugged.  One of the main symptoms
is a belief that the voices, hallucinations, strange sensations,
unaccountable fatigue, etc are all imposed by a malevolent
conspiracy.  So what good would drugs do?  All they would do (as
sufferers see it) is to make them helpless to resist.

Furthermore, the drugs that once were used to treat schizophrenia
(such as haloperidol) were very unpleasant, perhaps in part because
they suppress the brain's pleasure system.  (I'm told that the newer
"atypical" neuroleptics are much better.)  

	-- Bill






More information about the Neur-sci mailing list