BRAIN, INTELLIGENCE, MYOPIA: PSYC Call for Multiple Review

Stevan Harnad harnad at cogito.ecs.soton.ac.uk
Sun Jun 18 19:46:27 EST 2000


    PSYCOLOQUY CALL FOR BOOK REVIEWERS

    Below is the Abstract of the Precis of "Brain Size, Intelligence
    and Myopia" by Miles David Storfer (970 lines). This monograph has
    been selected for multiple review in Psycoloquy.

    THE FULL TEXT OF THE PRECIS IS AT:
    
    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psyc-bin/newpsy?11.083

    THE FULL TEXT OF THE MONOGRAPH FOR REVIEW IS DOWNLOADABLE FROM:

    http://www.gbhap-us.com/IJN   (US)
    http://www.gbhap.com/IJN      (elsewhere)

    If you wish to submit a formal review of this monograph, please
    write to psyc at pucc.princeton.edu indicating what expertise you
    would bring to bear on reviewing the book. (If you have never
    reviewed for PSYCOLOQUY or Behavioral & Brain Sciences before, it
    would be helpful if you could also append a copy of your CV to your
    inquiry.) Reviews can also be submitted without invitation, but all
    reviews will be refereed. The author will reply to all accepted
    reviews.

    FULL PSYCOLOQUY BOOK REVIEW INSTRUCTIONS AT:

    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/

    Please note that Psycoloquy reviews are of the full monograph, not
    the Precis. Review length should be about 200 lines [c. 1800
    words], with a short abstract (about 50 words), an indexable title,
    and reviewer's full name and institutional address, email and Home
    Page URL. All references that are electronically accessible should
    also have URLs.

    AUTHOR'S RATIONALE FOR SOLICITING MULTIPLE BOOK REVIEW

    Reviews of Storfer (1999), "Brain Size, Intelligence and
    Myopia," are invited on questions such as the following:

    (1) To what extent is the human brain growing intergenerationally,
    and why does the growth seem so specific to areas most heavily
    stressed by recent ancestral experience? (2) How does this brain
    growth relate to the gradual, substantial long-term rise in IQ
    scores? (3) How can the prevalence of myopia have risen so rapidly,
    yet continued to generate epidemiological data consistent with
    myopia as primarily an inherited condition? (4) Given the close
    correspondence between myopia and high IQ, and findings that relate
    neocortical size and IQ, does this imply a causal link between the
    secular increase in brain size and the upsurge in myopia? (5) Do
    recent post-mortem findings of a left-right asymmetry in a
    speech-analysis area of the neocortex of primates heavily exposed
    to (gestural + vocal) human speech, in contrast to the
    near-symmetry reported in much earlier studies, suggest a rapid,
    adaptive (intergenerational) biological response?

    The full text can be viewed and downloaded at no cost through the
    publisher's (Gordon and Breach) website:
    In the US: http://www.gbhap.com/IJN
    {note: the letters IJN must be capitalized}.
    Outside the US: http://www.gbhap-us.com/IJN may be required.

psycoloquy.00.11.083.brain-intelligence.1.storfer       Sun Jun 18 2000
ISSN 1055-0143       (54 paragraphs, 17 references, 6 notes, 884 lines)
PSYCOLOQUY is sponsored by the American Psychological Association (APA)
                Copyright 2000 Miles David Storfer

                BRAIN SIZE, INTELLIGENCE AND MYOPIA
    [International Journal of Neuroscience (1999), 98(3-4): 153-276]
                Precis of Storfer on Brain-Intelligence

                Miles David Storfer
                The Foundation for Brain Research
                46 Brittany A Drive
                Delray Beach FL 33446
                USA
                brainfoundation at aol.com

    ABSTRACT:  During the past century, a substantial increase has
    occurred in the size of the human brain, especially in
    'association' areas of the neocortex heavily used to cope with a
    complex language-driven society. It is proposed that this
    neocortical expansion has made possible the large, gradual increase
    in IQ that has occurred across the developed world, and been
    responsible for the dramatic upsurge in the prevalence and severity
    of near-sightedness (myopia) usually found after societies
    urbanize. The impetus for these changes begins during prenatal
    development. Findings from studies of mammals reared in captivity
    suggest that there is a mechanism for adaptive epigenetic
    inheritance, one capable of modifying the timing and/or extent of
    gene expression prenatally, without altering the DNA sequences that
    comprise protein-coding and other structural genes. Mechanisms that
    appear capable of transporting such adaptive changes across the
    so-called 'germ-line barrier' -- without violating the basic
    precepts of Darwin's theory -- are proposed. The social and
    evolutionary ramifications of our apparent proclivity for rapid,
    progressive, adaptive neocortical change are discussed, as well as
    some ways of testing aspects of this theory are proposed.

    KEYWORDS:  allergy, brain size, development, evolution, gene
    expression regulation, genomic imprinting, gifted, intelligence,
    myopia, neocortex.


    TEXT OF THE PRECIS IS AT:
    
    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psyc-bin/newpsy?11.083

    THE FULL TEXT OF THE MONOGRAPH FOR REVIEW IS DOWNLOADABLE FROM:

    http://www.gbhap-us.com/IJN   (US)
    http://www.gbhap.com/IJN      (elsewhere)

    PSYCOLOQUY BOOK REVIEW INSTRUCTIONS AT:

    http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
    http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/




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