Question about neural connections.

Sir Knowitall fell_nospamtrap_in at one.net.au
Wed Mar 15 15:55:04 EST 2000


I very much agree with you.

My previous response to this question/thread was *intended* to mean
something like this:

Humour can be umbrella-explained as an example of the "AEVASIVE" principle.

Approximately i.e.:

"Opportunity type and Adversity type "Selective" events or situations (N.B.
I am here using "Selection" in a dual/unified sense -- i.e. as, at least
potential motivational pressures whose *respective type* has also figured in
our phylogeny.

Thus, Selection "pressures" or "challenges", and their outcome, (i.e.
"Darwinian selection" of phenotypes and species, of individual behavioural
"choices", individual developmental outcomes, and even the development and
the features of different cultures) are in this sense mainly, if not just,
life-situational in character or has individuals at their current and past
"real-time Selection-centres".

By the way, both adversity type and opportunity type such pressures or
challenges "Selects" (in the above unified sense) from/of available
behaviour programs (inborn and aquired functural capabilities of each
individual's "acention selection system" [>=brain]) AND in the long run
(i.e. sometimes decisively) of phenotypes (and thus of "phenotypal/lineage
content/direction").

And so, the main point i was trying to put across was that a subtype of
Adversity type Selective situations (pressures, or challenges) -- by me
approximately described as "specific *Hibernation* imploring type
challenges" (always physically unavoidable and *potentially* overly
distressful) -- does often (as it inevitably did throughout phylogeny)
*overlap* with "opportunity type Selection pressures".

However general an overview of the main content of my thesis (at
http://web.one.net.au/~fellin/main.htm) it unifyingly explains humour and
laughter (and much else), and does so *not just* in the principle, as a
function of our "AEVASIVE" physioanatomy AND evolution. (The acronym
"concEPT" just used was pragmatically (and not without a certain humour)
derived from: Ambi-advantageaously Evolved, Vital, Actention Selection
(System) Incorporating (centrally) Various Endo-opiates"

Peter

--
Yours truly is a proponent of "anthropocentric, science-aligned,
omniphilosophical conceptualism", as a platform for self- and societal
regulation. My English-purist testing, forever-full-of-flawed-phrases,
philosophical FOOT-print can be viewed via
http://web.one.net.au/~fellin/main.htm

Leonard Robichaud <len.robichaud at sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:38CE40C2.4987458B at sympatico.ca...
> About your question regarding humour - I think it is too simplistic to
> relate all things to natural selection. While natural selection
undoubtedly
> has played a part in the evolution of the mind I don't think its necessary
> to show that each and every characteristic of the mind has an adaptive
> value that has been directly selected for. Some characteristics may be
> neutral or even maladaptive 'side effects' of adaptive traits that will
> persist as long as their consequences don't outweigh the benefits of those
> adaptive traits (in the long run). One way to look at humour is as a
result
> of information processing in the brain: when information is organized in a
> certain way it gives rise to the experience of humour. You may want to
read
> Edward De Bono's Mechanism of Mind for details.
>
> Ev wrote:
>
> > This may seem silly and obvious but I'm confused. Since every neuron
> > can have up to 10,000 dendrites but only 1 axon it seems to me that
> > there is a mismatch of inputs and outputs. What am I missing? Can a
> > single axon terminal sit on more than 1 dendrite?
> >
> > Also, I posed the following question to a newsgroup on evolutionary
> > biology but the responses were not very convincing: what is the purpose
> > of laughter and why do we have areas in the brain devoted to finding
> > things comical and humorous? Can anyone help with this?
> >
> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > Before you buy.
>
>
>






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