neurotransmitter storage (all or one?)

TonyJeffs2 tonyjeffs2 at aol.comTonyJ
Fri Sep 8 10:23:30 EST 2000


Hi,
I'm a latecomer to this discussion and am probably missing the point, but here
is my view. Here Goes.

A computer memory address works by having a state of 0v or 5v .  To get to 5
volts, that memory address requires the movement of a specific large number of
electrons, specific to that particular memory address, and similar to other
similar memory addresses.  So the movement of a large number of electrons is
necessary to generate a binary change

A neuron works by having a state of no AP or AP.  To generate an AP, it
requires a specific large number of nerutransmitter molecules, specific to that
particular neuron, and similar to other similar neurons.  So the movement of a
specific large number of nt molecules is necessary to generate a binary change.

Thus, the two situations are the same.

I've ignored the fact that there are inhibitory and excitatory nts. That makes
for a slightly more complicated equation, but the end argument is the same.

And then ther is the matter of potentiation, at which point the two systems are
not the same.

But they are both digital; not analog.

Tony







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