Auditory hallucinations, physiological/anatomical deviances

Didier A. Depireux didier at tango.isr.umd.edu
Mon Apr 30 22:00:32 EST 2001


Orbs <funk_brotherhood at hotmail.com> wrote:

> The last one about about the woman hearing different frequencies sounds
> interesting and probably more in the direction intended. 

This is a paper I read wayyy back when. The woman heard different
frequencies depending on where she was looking following a surgery. I am
glad it wasn't me! (the actualy paper is pretty specific, unlike what the
abstract suggests).

Hear Res 1994 Dec;81(1-2):22-32
Anomalous cross-modal plasticity following posterior fossa surgery: some
speculations on gaze-evoked tinnitus.

A unique and intriguing form of subjective tinnitus evoked by eye gaze is
reviewed. A new perspective is presented because this condition is
sufficiently different from other forms of subjective tinnitus and its
manifestation cannot be adequately explained by existing models or
conceptual frameworks. Our examination of this topic considers
pathophysiologic changes in the central nervous system in the context of
deafferentation-induced plasticity. Potential neuroanatomical areas
contributing to this effect include a number of distributed and
functionally diverse areas in the brainstem and neocortex involved in the
auditory control of eye movements. We also consider contemporary
psychophysical methods to evaluate the perceptual correlates of this
phenomenon and tools for the development of objective tinnitus
measurements. Although theoretical and speculative in nature, this article
is intended to stimulate interest in, advance knowledge of, and provide a
better understanding about this condition.

						Didier

-- 
Didier A Depireux                              didier at isr.umd.edu
Neural Systems Lab                 http://www.isr.umd.edu/~didier
Institute for Systems Research          Phone: 301-405-6557 (off)
University of Maryland                                -6596 (lab)
College Park MD 20742 USA                     Fax: 1-301-314-9920




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