Are men really brain damaged at birth?

John H John at faraway.com.au
Wed Jul 11 10:23:56 EST 2001


This might help
Journal: Molecular Brain Research
pp 119-130
Hypothalamic and amygdaloid corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and CRH
receptor-1 mRNA expression in the stress-hyporesponsive late pregnant and
early lactating rat
A.P.C. da Costa, X. Ma, C.D. Ingram, S.L. Lightman, G. Aguilera


Jim M <mjames6587 at qwest.net> wrote in message
news:CNe%6.3944$im3.818758 at news.uswest.net...
>
>
> > After having read the books I mention, and knowing of all the
> > diversity in the skills we can develop, and how impressive and
> > uncomparable they can be, studies of who are the most intelligent
> > based on some iq test seem to me too much an oversimplification.
> > This is only an opinion.
>
> I think the jury is still out - WAY out - on even what exactly
> "intelligence" really IS, much less how to measure it; the debate still
> burns hotly in the psychological community.
>
> Anyway, I wanted to add my two cents based on research I did back in 1993.
> We were looking at the behavioral effects of corticosterone on rats, using
a
> 12-arm radial maze and a Morris water maze. Previous physiological
research
> by Robert Sapolsky at Stanford had shown that injection schedules at a
7-day
> duration of large doses of corticosterone (300m/cc) had led to significant
> morphology of pyramidal cells in the CA-2 and CA-3 regions of the
> hippocampus. We injected (with similar doses) for 30 days. The interesting
> thing was, experimental females appeared to perform BETTER on the memory
> tasks. Thinking there might be an interaction with estrogen, we replicated
> the study but added sterilization into the population (thus, squaring the
> MANOVA matrix and creating a rather cumbersome model). Unfortunately, due
to
> sloppy data-collection, sloppy lab techniques, and high mortality (due to
> the afformentioned sloppiness), we had to scrap the project. I would like
to
> take another stab at the project, however, as I sensed that there was
indeed
> an interaction of sex-hormones with stress-hormones among the females.
This
> would make sense within an evolutionary perspective.
>
> Jim
>
>
> --
> Jim McQuiggin
>
> "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he
> hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears,
however
> measured or far away."
> -Henry David Thoreau, Walden
>
>
>
>
>





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