Increased blood flow detected by fMRI scans?

Richard Norman rsnorman at mediaone.net
Sat Oct 27 15:54:24 EST 2001


On Sat, 27 Oct 2001 20:10:05 +0200, "Brian" <zhil at online.no> wrote:

>"John H." <John at faraway.com.au> skrev i melding
>news:zXwC7.2226$Fi4.127395 at ozemail.com.au...
>>
>> "Brian" <zhil at online.no> wrote in message
>> news:YRhC7.174$n%.3854 at news1.oke.nextra.no...
>> >
>> > "John H." <John at faraway.com.au> skrev i melding
>> > news:sq6C7.1600$Fi4.91565 at ozemail.com.au...
>> > > > Could these, perhaps, outweight the ion pump cost?
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > In localised regions that seems possible. I find it very difficult to
>> > think
>> > > about such matters, quantification is a hassle here. Recently read an
>> > > article (sorry, can't reference it, just a browse), which suggested
>that
>> > > synapses are not 'constant', that a synapse will degrade but another
>> > > immediately or concurrently arises to 'take its place'. It does seem
>> > > plausible that even in a 'non-learning' CNS region there is a certain
>> > amount
>> > > of synaptic restructuring etc taking place. It may be the case that an
>> > > activated CNS region experiences a certain number of synapse 'deaths'
>as
>> a
>> > > natural consequence of activity, so maintenance of synaptic
>> integrity(and
>> > I
>> > > imagine this requires transcription) at high levels of activity could
>> > > outweight ion pump cost? Interesting question, thanks because I know
>> > bugger
>> > > all about synaptic formation.
>> > >
>> > > John H.
>> >
>> > My .02 ECU's
>> > Yan had this interesting theory about the restructuring of the brain
>> during
>> > sleep.
>> > Is this what your looking for ?
>>
>>
>> No thanks Brian, perhaps later. At present I'm trying to write up some
>> papers on neurodegeneration. You may have gathered this current
>> preoccupation by the nature of my posts. It is proving extremely
>difficult,
>> I'm happy to make it a part time hobby and leave the real work to the
>bods.
>> As a layman the challenge in creating a good conceptual structures in
>order
>> to deal with the relevant research has proved hard enough, the last thing
>my
>> attentionally challenged brain needs is something else to think about!
>>
>> Why won't someone prescribe me Dexedrine? Or for a challenge L deprenyl
>...
>
>If you can find a way to increase the production of CREB-1, you'll solve
>most problems.
>(CREB-1 initiates the production of synapses, and hence to enhance memory.
>forget glutamate and other synaptic messengers).
>
>Brian
>
>> John H.
>

Lets see, now.

 According to http://www.stanford.edu/~ewilhelm/Cumulus/CREB1.htm
CREB1 is involved in Ovarian follicle growth and/or maturation,
Follicle atresia, Ovulation, Steroidogenesis, Luteinization .

And http://www.lf2.cuni.cz/physiolres/2000/issue3/iss3cl10.htm 
talks about CREB1 in T-lymphocytes stimulated by prostaglandin.

And http://www.socgenmicrobiol.org.uk/JGV/081/1057/0811057H.HTM
says that CREB1 is involved in activation of Epstein-Barr virus.

And
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10873779&dopt=Abstract
involves CREB1 in linkage between stress and human cytomegaolvirus
infection.

See be careful what you ask for!






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