Increased blood flow detected by fMRI scans?

Richard Norman rsnorman at mediaone.net
Mon Oct 29 17:10:34 EST 2001


On Mon, 29 Oct 2001 20:53:41 +0100, "Brian" <zhil at online.no> wrote:

>
>Science".
>Wow !! That was quite a book (1414 pages!!) I could dig into this one.....
>Hope I'm not sounding to cheeky, because I'm not that kind of a person.
>Anyway, to me parts of neuroscience doesn't seem that hard, while other is
>quite slippery (distribution of function in the Cortex is one).
>Is it harder than I'm imagining, or is it that it just takes a lot of time
>to get used to things ?

If Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel isn't enough, there are two other
encyclopedic neuroscience texts:

Neuroscience (2nd Ed)
Dale Purves, and others
Sinauer Associates, 2000
http://www.sinauer.com/Titles/frpurvesne.htm

Fundamental Neuroscience
M.J.Zigmond, F.E.Bloom, S.Landis, J.L.Roberts, and L.R.Squire, eds.
Academic Press, 1998
http://www.apnet.com/fn/

These (any one of them) are really quite definite treatments of
whatever you may be interested in in the area.  If you are interested,
I also have a list of much more accessible books.  These are suitable
for medical and graduate school texts. 

I am not familiar with Sherman and Guillery's work on the thalamus.
But I would guess that a more general work would be of greater value.
Something complete would allow you to dip into whatever subject you
might want to explore -- molecular biology of the neuron, synaptic
mechanisms, vision, motor control, development -- the whole works.




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