A Theory of Sleep

Yoda_Buddy paloyoda at mnsi.net
Wed Sep 26 03:48:11 EST 2001


   I don't know much about the science of sleep, but I saw a show once where
they got a group of people to undergo an experiment in sleep deprivation.
After they had gone with minimal to no sleep for a period of time, the
testers noticed that they seemed to be fine physically, but could not
perform mentally. They got on excercise bicycles, and did fine, but were not
able to do fairly simple math questions.
Arthur T. Murray <uj797 at victoria.tc.ca> wrote in message
news:3b77fb27 at news.victoria.tc.ca...
> "yan king yin" wrote on Mon, 13 Aug 2001:
>
> > Hi All,
> >
> > This is the first draft of my paper.
> > Critiques or comments welcome.
> >
> > The HTML version with a few figures is at:
> > http://www.angelfire.com/myband/sevenless/Sleep.htm
> >
> > =================
> > A Theory of Sleep
> > =================
> >
> > The Generative theory of sleep is proposed here.
> > It is based on synaptic selectionism, summarized below.
> > The new theory construes REM sleep as the generator of
> > "random" synaptic connections; and slow-wave sleep as
> > the stage where inadaptive synapses are eliminated.
> > Molecular mechanisms are speculated upon.  [...]
> ATM:
> Thank you for this very well thought-out paper on Usenet.
>
> Some collateral ideas on a theory of mind are on-line at
> http://sourceforge.net/projects/mind/ in the Docs area.
>
> > [...] The random generation in REM sleep might be
> > the reason why dreams are bizarre. Also, immediately
> > after waking, the brain needs a period of adaptation
> > before being fully awake. This indicates that there
> > might be reorganization during sleep.  [...]
> >
> > (13 August 2001) contact author: y.k.y at lycos.com





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