sympathectomy DEAD T2 Ganglia

jakie jakieboodersnip1158 at hotmail.com
Mon Apr 15 15:49:54 EST 2002


I'm very concerned about a nerological procedure taking place in
Europe and America known as ETS (Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy),
which involves cutting with a hot scapple betwen the T1 and T2
Ganglia, to relieve hand sweating in individuals.

This renders a patient unable to sweat from the nipple line up,
including the hands, arms, shoulders, face and head.  These people
will never sweat normally again. People are seeking nerve grafts to
help relieve some of the irregular sweating patterns they got from
ETS.

NOW, some surgeons are claiming to be able to endoscopically repair
this damage by grafting the separated ganglia together with a sural
nerve.  They claim to be able to relieve some of the wierd sweating
with this repair.  It is said that the T2 ganglia is "fried" as a
result of ETS, with the efferent and afferent communication rami and
the T2 ganglion being cooked.

One American ETS surgeon claims that he can re-suture a sural nerve
into this gap from T1 down to T2 and expect positive regrowth and
transmission between the T2 to T1 because the T2 gangion WILL
REGENERATE.

A leading European ETS surgeon uses a different method of repair.  He
claims the T2 ganglia is "fried" as a result of ETS, with the efferent
and afferent communication rami and the T2 ganglion being cooked. He
claims that the T2 ganglion WILL NOT REGENERATE.  His technique
involves by-passing the T2 altogether and re-suturing a sural nerve
inbetween the T1 and the sound upper terminal end of the T3 ganglion,
which bridges the T2 out of the game altogether.  With this he claims
to re-introduce positive growth and transmission between the T3 and T1
ganglia.

I am not a Dr., but it seems to me that the European way finds a fresh
terminal body to connect to and would seem to work better than the
direct suture of the graft into the "dead" sural nerve.

Is the T2 really dead following ETS?  

Can the T2 nerve cell REGENERATE if it has been cooked by a hot
cautory scalple?

Thanks, Jakie




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