Question ?

Taechon karla at
Sun Apr 14 07:57:05 EST 2002

LOL,  My specialty is perpetrators of violent crimes.  I love the most
difficult stuff you can imagine.  I prefer highly manipulative populations.
Just my niche.  We all have to be good at something.  My
cognitive-existentialist techniques are a bit watered down for my private
practice.  Still, this is the internet... I just call em like I see em.  I
attended my graduation with a baseball cap that had "Pathology Hunter"
written across the front of it.  My mentors were delighted and got a good
laugh out of it but many of the faculty were .... well you can imagine.
Perhaps I'm jaded by 20 years of working with street gangs, social services,
and the legal system.  95% of all perpetrators re-offend, regardless of what
anyone does to or for them and those who want to help, burn out faster than
any other group.  What can I say, I love the trenches but do the other stuff
to make money.  I seriously hope our profession does begin looking more
towards the strengths that people possess.

I've recently made a profession change into the private sector for a lot
more money.
"Ruthie" <rah3 at> wrote in message
news:a9557s$63k$2 at
> "Taechon" <karla at>
> > It will cause you to look for sickness and pathology in all those you
> meet.
> > You will become a "pathology hunter."  Even when there is no pathology
> > all, you will not only be able to invent one but you will be able to
> > convince another person that they are suffering from it. You will begin
> > taking yourself and life way to seriously and your sense of humor, if
> > ever had one to begin with, will fade into oblivion.  You will become a
> > helper and as such you will see yourself as somehow bigger and better
> > all those poor sick assholes you are helping.  Your sense of self worth
> will
> > be tied into how others see you.  If they say "wow, your a great
> therapist,
> > thanks for helping me." You will feel great about yourself.  If they
> > "you are out of your fucking mind, that's not what's wrong with me."
> > will learn to tell them that they are only being "resistant."  It will
> > obvious to you that if only they did what you told them to do, they
> be
> > cured.
> >
> Or you might develop a lot of clinical and research skills that will
> you to better help people and carry out research which will inform
> practice.
> Though what Taechon says is quite true - some psychologists do look for
> pathology, it all depends on the particular theoretical model you lean
> towards - psychanalysis does tend to be focused on pathology.
> However, more and more, psychology is becoming positive, and trying to
> at health and solutions and not just labelling people with problems.
> Keep your head screwed on and your feet on the ground, and make sure you
> hang around with non-psychology friends, when dealing with clients focus
> the positives and what they can do - even things that they can do that you
> can't....and you'll be a good psychologist.
> You don't aseem to like psychologists Taechon - is there a reason for
> (Yup, I'm pathology hunting again - just can't help myself!)

More information about the Neur-sci mailing list