brain sizes: Einstein's and women's

blujuju blujuju at hotmail.com
Tue Aug 13 09:35:21 EST 2002


"John Knight" <johnknight at usa.com> wrote in message
news:iO_59.22551$eb.1828429 at news2.west.cox.net...
: "blujuju" <blujuju at hotmail.com> wrote in message news:aj8i3h$19380s$1 at ID-
: > : Yet another one of your fantasies shot to shit, JK.
: >
: > Mr Jefferson was a theist.
: > Our John apparently cannot discern between theist and christian.
: >
: > blu
: >
:
:
: Mr. Jefferson was a CHRISTIAN.
:
: Mr. Jefferson wrote in his own hand, numerous times, "I am a real
: Christian".

Show me. And references to christianparty.net will not be acceptable
sources, nor other christian based websites. They're biased.

: Morons who don't even know what Christianity is certainly can't be
expected
: to know who a Christian is, could they?
: http://christianparty.net/tj.htm

Ahhh... here come's the "They're not TRUE CHRISTIANS(tm)" arguement.


: John Knight
:
:
:
: ps--here are some excerpts from that page:
:
:
: Thomas Jefferson on the Talmud
:
: "What a wretched depravity of sentiment and manners must have prevailed
: before such corrupt maxims could have obtained credit! It is impossible to
: collect from these writings a consistent series of moral Doctrine.'
Enfield,
: B. 4. chap. 3. It was the reformation of this `wretched depravity' of
morals
: which Jesus undertook.
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on Calvinism
:
: "Calvin's character of this supreme being seems chiefly copied from that
of
: the Jews."
:
: "The truth is that the greatest enemies to the doctrines of Jesus are
those
: calling themselves the expositors of them, who have perverted them for the
: structure of a system of fancy absolutely incomprehensible, and without
any
: foundation in his genuine words."
:
: "Calvin's character of this supreme being seems chiefly copied from that
of
: the Jews. But the reformation of these blasphemous attributes, and
: substitution of those more worthy, pure and sublime, seems to have been
the
: chief object of Jesus in his discources to the Jews: and his doctrine of
the
: Cosmogony of the world is very clearly laid down in the 3 first verses of
: the 1st. chapter of John, in these words, `{en arche en o logos, kai o
logos
: en pros ton Theon kai Theos en o logos. `otos en en arche pros ton Theon.
: Panta de ayto egeneto, kai choris ayto egeneto ode en, o gegonen}. Which
: truly translated means `in the beginning God existed, and reason (or mind)
: was with God, and that mind was God. This was in the beginning with God.
All
: things were created by it, and without it was made not one thing which was
: made'. Yet this text, so plainly declaring the doctrine of Jesus that the
: world was created by the supreme, intelligent being, has been perverted by
: modern Christians to build up a second person of their tritheism by a
: mistranslation of the word {logos}."
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on Quakerism
:
: Nothing can be more exactly and seriously true than what is there stated;
: that but a short time elapsed after the death of the great reformer of the
: Jewish religion, before his principles were departed from by those who
: professed to be his special servants, and perverted into an engine for
: enslaving mankind, and aggrandising their oppressors in Church and State;
: that the purest system of morals ever before preached to man, has been
: adulterated and sophisticated by artificial constructions, into a mere
: contrivance to filch wealth and power to themselves; that rational men not
: being able to swallow their impious heresies, in order to force them down
: their throats, they raise the hue and cry of infidelity, while themselves
: are the greatest obstacles to the advancement of the real doctrines of
: Jesus, and do in fact constitute the real Anti-Christ.
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on Christianity
:
: Because of  his influence, the Virginia Constitution contains, to this
day,
: the direct reference to Christianity
: http://legis.state.va.us/vaonline/li1a.htm
:
: "That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of
: discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by
force
: or violence; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free
: exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience; and that it
: is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love, and
: charity towards each other."
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on jews
:
: SYLLABUS OF AN ESTIMATE OF THE MERIT OF THE DOCTRINES OF JESUS, COMPARED
: WITH THOSE OF OTHERS April, 1803
:
:    II. JEWS. 1. Their system was Deism; that is, the belief of one only
God.
: But their ideas of him & of his attributes were degrading & injurious.
:
:    2. Their Ethics were not only imperfect, but often irreconcilable with
: the sound dictates of reason & morality, as they respect intercourse with
: those around us; & repulsive & anti-social, as respecting other nations.
: They needed reformation, therefore, in an eminent degree.
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on the First Amendment
:
: "The bill for establishing religious freedom, the principles of which had,
: to a certain degree, been enacted before, I had drawn in all the latitude
of
: reason & right. It still met with opposition; but, with some mutilations
in
: the preamble, it was finally passed; and a singular proposition proved
that
: it's protection of opinion was meant to be universal. Where the preamble
: declares that coercion is a departure from the plan of the holy author of
: our religion, an amendment was proposed, by inserting the word "Jesus
: Christ," so that it should read "a departure from the plan of Jesus
Christ,
: the holy author of our religion." The insertion was rejected by a great
: majority, in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of
it's
: protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and Mahometan, the
: Hindoo, and infidel of every denomination."
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on exiling the slaves
:
: But as this would be no punishment or change of condition to slaves (me
: miserum!) let them be sent to other countries. By these means we should be
: freed from the wickedness of the latter, & the former would be living
: monuments of public vengeance.
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on the degraded state of jews
:
: JESUS, SOCRATES, AND OTHERS, To Dr. Joseph Priestley, Washington, Apr. 9,
: 1803, 1803040
: DEAR SIR, -- While on a short visit lately to Monticello, I received from
: you a copy of your comparative view of Socrates & Jesus, and I avail
myself
: of the first moment of leisure after my return to acknolege the pleasure
had
: in the perusal of it, and the desire it excited to see you take up the
: subject on a more extensive scale. In consequence of some conversation
with
: Dr. Rush, in the year 1798-99, I had promised some day to write him a
letter
: giving him my view of the Christian system. I have reflected often on it
: since, & even sketched the outlines in my own mind. I should first take a
: general view of the moral doctrines of the most remarkable of the antient
: philosophers, of whose ethics we have sufficient information to make an
: estimate, say of Pythagoras, Epicurus, Epictetus, Socrates, Cicero,
Seneca,
: Antoninus. I should do justice to the branches of morality they have
treated
: well; but point out the importance of those in which they are deficient.
: should then take a view of the deism and ethics of the Jews, and show in
: what a degraded state they were, and the necessity they presented of a
: reformation. I should proceed to a view of the life, character, &
doctrines
: of Jesus, who sensible of incorrectness of their ideas of the Deity, and
of
: morality, endeavored to bring them to the principles of a pure deism, and
: juster notions of the attributes of God, to reform their moral doctrines
to
: the standard of reason, justice & philanthropy, and to inculcate the
belief
: of a future state. This view would purposely omit the question of his
: divinity, & even his inspiration. To do him justice, it would be necessary
: to remark the disadvantages his doctrines have to encounter, not having
been
: committed to writing by himself, but by the most unlettered of men, by
: memory, long after they had heard them from him; when much was forgotten,
: much misunderstood, & presented in very paradoxical shapes. Yet such are
the
: fragments remaining as to show a master workman, and that his system of
: morality was the most benevolent & sublime probably that has been ever
: taught, and consequently more perfect than those of any of the antient
: philosophers. His character & doctrines have received still greater injury
: from those who pretend to be his special disciples, and who have
disfigured
: and sophisticated his actions & precepts, from views of personal interest,
: so as to induce the unthinking part of mankind to throw off the whole
system
: in disgust, and to pass sentence as an impostor on the most innocent, the
: most benevolent, the most eloquent and sublime character that ever has
been
: exhibited to man. This is the outline; but I have not the time, & still
less
: the information which the subject needs. It will therefore rest with me in
: contemplation only. You are the person who of all others would do it best,
: and most promptly. You have all the materials at hand, and you put
together
: with ease. I wish you could be induced to extend your late work to the
whole
: subject. I have not heard particularly what is the state of your health;
but
: as it has been equal to the journey to Philadelphia, perhaps it might
: encourage the curiosity you must feel to see for once this place, which
: nature has formed on a beautiful scale, and circumstances destine for a
: great one. As yet we are but a cluster of villages; we cannot offer you
the
: learned society of Philadelphia; but you will have that of a few
characters
: whom you esteem, & a bed & hearty welcome with one who will rejoice in
every
: opportunity of testifying to you his high veneration & affectionate
: attachment.
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
: Thomas Jefferson on the degraded state of jews
:
: THE CODE OF JESUS, To John Adams, Monticello, Oct. 12, 1813, 1813101
: DEAR SIR -- Since mine of Aug. 22. I have recieved your favors of Aug. 16.
: Sep. 2. 14. 15. and -- and Mrs. Adams's of Sep. 20. I now send you,
: according to your request a copy of the Syllabus. To fill up this skeleton
: with arteries, with veins, with nerves, muscles and flesh, is really
beyond
: my time and information. Whoever could undertake it would find great aid
in
: Enfield's judicious abridgment of Brucker's history of Philosophy, in
which
: he has reduced 5. or 6. quarto vols. of 1000. pages each of Latin closely
: printed, to two moderate 8 vos. of English, open, type.
:
:    To compare the morals of the old, with those of the new testament,
would
: require an attentive study of the former, a search thro' all it's books
for
: it's precepts, and through all it's history for it's practices, and the
: principles they prove. Ascommentaries too on these, the philosophy of the
: Hebrews must be enquired into, their Mishna, their Gemara, Cabbala,
Jezirah,
: Sohar, Cosri, and their Talmud must be examined and understood, in order
to
: do them full justice. Brucker, it should seem, has gone deeply into these
: Repositories of their ethics, and Enfield, his epitomiser, concludes in
: these words:
:
: `Ethics were so little studied among the Jews, that, in their whole
: compilation called the Talmud, there is only one treatise on moral
subjects.
: Their books of Morals chiefly consisted in a minute enumeration of duties.
: From the law of Moses were deduced 613. precepts, which were divided into
: two classes, affirmative and negative, 248 in the former, and 365 in the
: latter. It may serve to give the reader some idea of the low state of
moral
: philosophy among the Jews in the Middle age, to add, that of the 248.
: affirmative precepts, only 3. were considered as obligatory upon women;
and
: that, in order to obtain salvation, it was judged sufficient to fulfill
any
: one single law in the hour of death; the observance of the rest being
deemed
: necessary, only to increase the felicity of the future life. What a
wretched
: depravity of sentiment and manners must have prevailed before such corrupt
: maxims could have obtained credit! It is impossible to collect from these
: writings a consistent series of moral Doctrine.' Enfield, B. 4. chap. 3.
:
: It was the reformation of this `wretched depravity' of morals which Jesus
: undertook. In extracting the pure principles which he taught, we should
have
: to strip off the artificial vestments in which they have been muffled by
: priests, who have travestied them into various forms, as instruments of
: riches and power to them. We must dismiss the Platonists and Plotinists,
the
: Stagyrites and Gamalielites, the Eclectics the Gnostics and Scholastics,
: their essences and emanations, their Logos and Demi-urgos, Aeons and
Daemons
: male and female, with a long train of Etc. Etc. Etc. or, shall I say at
: once, of Nonsense. We must reduce our volume to the simple evangelists,
: select, even from them, the very words only of Jesus, paring off the
: Amphibologisms into which they have been led by forgetting often, or not
: understanding, what had fallen from him, by giving their own
misconceptions
: as his dicta, and expressing unintelligibly for others what they had not
: understood themselves. There will be found remaining the most sublime and
: benevolent code of morals which has ever been offered to man. have
performed
: this operation for my own use, by cutting verse by verse out of the
printed
: book, and arranging, the matter which is evidently his, andwhich is as
: easily distinguishable as diamonds in a dunghill.The result is an 8 vo. of
: 46. pages of pure and unsophisticated doctrines, such as were professed
and
: acted on by the unlettered apostles, the Apostolic fathers, and the
: Christians of the (Page 1302) 1st. century. Their Platonising successors
: indeed, in after times, in order to legitimate the corruptions which they
: had incorporated into the doctrines of Jesus, found it necessary to
disavow
: the primitive Christians, who had taken their principles from the mouth of
: Jesus himself, of his Apostles, and the Fathers cotemporary with them.
They
: excommunicated their followers as heretics, branding them with the
: opprobrious name of Ebionites or Beggars.
:
:
: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: ----
:
:
:





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