brain sizes: Einstein's and women's

John Knight jwknight at polbox.com
Thu Aug 22 14:27:12 EST 2002


"Bob LeChevalier" <lojbab at lojban.org> wrote in message
news:ihd9muocrpghu2paoshg2n3c52anpetvt7 at 4ax.com...
> "John Knight" <jwknight at polbox.com> wrote:
> >This is about the maximum amount of intellectual stimulation we can
expect
> >from a jew, isn't it?  You can't possibly address the issues, so you
flail
> >around, jump up and down, wave your arms, accuse people of being
"followers"
> >of someone, spit out the word "Aryan" like it's a dirty word, create new
> >names so you have even more people to insult--ultimately land on that
> >favorite jewish past-time and all time Talmudic achievement, scatology,
> >then---
>
> This is about the maximum amount of intellectual stimulation we can
> expect from a Nazi, isn't it?  You can't possibly address the issues,
> so you flail around, jump up and down, wave your arms, accuse people
> of being "feminazis", spit out the word "jew" like it's a dirty word,
> create new names ("wiberals") so you have even more people to
> insult--ultimately land on that favorite Nazi past-time and all time
> nincompoop achievement, scatology, then---
>
> >wonder why nation, after nation, after nation, after nation ... 86 times
...
> >keep kicking your sorry butts out of town.
>
> wonder why poster, after poster, after poster, after poster ... far
> more than 86 times ... keeps kicking your sorry arguments out the
> window.
>
> >Would it bother you too terribly much if we got back to the topic at
hand:
> >brain sizes: Einstein's  and women's?
>
> Would it bother you too terribly much if we got back to the topic at
> hand:
> Your nincompoopery.
>
> (There is no other topic when you are posting in a thread.)
>
> lojbab

Actually, the topic is "brain sizes: Einstein's  and women's", but since you
insist on diverging off to all these other topics, let's focus on your
"nincompoopery":

You wrote:
"I know of many people who believe that Christianity is something different
from what you appear to believe it is.  I don't believe that anyone but God
is authorized to judge what is in our hearts, which is what determines
whether we are saved through Christ."

This statement was followed up with:

From: "Bob LeChevalier" lojbab at lojban.org
Newsgroups:
alt.feminism,bionet.neuroscience,soc.men,alt.religion.wicca,alt.education,al
t.religion
Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2002 8:02 PM
Subject: Re: brain sizes: Einstein's and women's
> where the "document" in question was Jefferson's rewrite of the Bible
> that eliminated all the miracles, leaving Christ as merely a great
> teacher of morals and ethics, by which standards, probably many
> Moslems and Wiccans could say "I am a Christian", too.


"This makes the assumption that those who know nothing guess randomly. IN
reality, we don't know that people guess randomly when faced with a test
question they do not understand.  Indeed, we know that they do not."

These two false, hypocritical statements summarize what it is about
"liberals" educated in the US public "school" system that makes them so
ignorant of the world they live in and the life's philosophy of our Founding
Forefathers who made this a once-great country.   The inability and
unwillingness of "liberals" to grasp some of the most basic concepts can
probably never be changed, no matter how much this nation spends for
"education".  They are in fact living proof that doubling the cost of
education from 4% to 8% of GDP is most likely a major reason SAT scores
plunged 98 points, the US scored dead last in 17 of 34 TIMSS subjects, and
American 12th grade girls scored lower on one third of the multiple choice
questions than if they'd just guessed.

Is it even possible that there may be some truth to the statement:  "Indeed,
we know that they do not ... guess randomly when faced with a test question
they do not understand"?

No, there is not.   When American girls failed to correctly answer so many
multiple choice questions, and when the test results show that they did not
omit the question and did provide at least some kind of a response, then we
know that they guessed at many of the answers.  Is it possible that their
guesses were not random?

The only evidence that they didn't guess randomly on many questions is the
fact that they scored lower on one third of the TIMSS physics questions than
if they had just guessed randomly.  This means that there was some factor
that influenced them to answer the questions wrong, so their answers cannot
be considered to be random.  Whether this is because they were taught the
wrong thing in the classroom (even though the boys sitting right next to
them were taught the right thing), or because they believed the myth about
"women's intuition" and decided to rely on this rather than answer the
question based on what they were taught, is irrelevant.  The fact is that
being so consistent in selecting the wrong answer on this third of the test
is the only evidence we have that they didn't guess randomly.

Of the 38 physics questions for which the answers were made available to the
public, the amount by which girls scored higher than if they had just
guessed was statistically significant on 17 of them, the amount by which
they scored higher or lower than if they had just guessed was not
statistically significant on 12 of them, and the amount by which they scored
lower than if they had just guessed was statistically significant on 9 of
them.

Of the 17 questions or 45% of the test where the amount by which they scored
higher than if they'd just guessed and their responses were statistically
significant, they scored significantly lower than boys on 9 (24% of the
test), significantly higher on 1 (2.6% of the test), and the difference
between boys and girls was not statistically significant on 7 of them (18%
of the test).   Of the 12 questions or 32% of the test where their response
was not statistically significant, they scored significantly lower than boys
on 4 and the difference was not statistically significant on 8 of them.  Of
the 9 questions or 24% of the test where the amount by which they scored
significantly lower than if they'd just guessed, they scored significantly
lower than boys on 8 and significantly higher than boys on 1.

On some questions there may have been a clue that caused them to select one
answer over the other, so it could be argued that guesses on some other
questions were also not random.  But when their responses were not
statistically significant on almost a third of the test, or 32% of the
questions, we know that at least ONE question didn't provide any clues like
this, which would mean that the only way they were able to provide a
response was to guess randomly, which makes this statement false.  It's
highly likely that their responses to all 12 questions were based solely on
random guesses, which means that we know that they DID "guess randomly", not
that they did not.

Because their responses were lower than if they'd just guessed or were not
statistically significant on 21 questions, the results of this 55% of the
test cannot be used to assess their skills.



The following Table summarizes the answers to the 38 TIMSS Physics questions
for which the original problems are described.  The first column is the
Question Number, the second column describes whether the question was a
multiple choice problem or not, the third column is the percent of girls who
scored higher than if they'd just guessed on the multiple choice questions,
the fourth column is whether or not this difference was statistically
significant and by what percentage it exceeded the 3% standard error, the
fifth column is by what percentage boys scored higher than girls (or with
negative numbers, by what percentage girls scored higher than boys), and the
sixth column is whether or not this difference was statistically significant
and by what percentage it exceeded the 3% standard error.

For example, Question G10 was a multiple choice question where 4.7% of the
girls scored lower than if they'd just guessed. After subtracting the 3%
standard error, it was statistically significant that 1.7% of them scored
lower than if they'd just guessed.  4.5% more boys than girls got this
question correct, and 1.5% of their responses were statistically
significant.   Question H01 was a multiple choice question where girls
scored 17% higher than if they'd just guessed, 4.1% more girls than boys got
this question correct, and the amount by which this difference was
statistically significant was 1.1%.   It was the only question which was
statistically significant and where girls scored higher than if they'd just
guessed where the amount by which girls scored higher than boys was
statistically significant.  This was a memorization question.  On none of
the questions which involved calculations did girls score higher than boys.

John Knight





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