brain sizes: Einstein's and women's

Hope Munro Smith hopems at mail.utexas.edu
Fri Jul 12 20:28:13 EST 2002


In article <AhLX8.49083$P%6.3468866 at news2.west.cox.net>, "John Knight"
<johnknight at usa.com> wrote:

> "Cary Kittrell" <cary at afone.as.arizona.edu> wrote in message
> news:agn34f$hla$1 at oasis.ccit.arizona.edu...
> > In article  <SZCX8.47920$P%6.3357792 at news2.west.cox.net>
> > "John Knight" <johnknight at usa.com> writes:
> > <
> > <
> > <"Shadow Dancer" <insomniac at winterslight.org> wrote in message
> > <news:agm2br$mukqa$1 at ID-150265.news.dfncis.de...
> > <> Here are some I just dug up:
> > <>
> >     {...}
> > <>
> > <> And yet another:
> > <> http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/heshe.html
> > <>
> > <> My terminology was wrong, I meant the corpus callosum.  Either way,
> women
> > <> use their entire brains more efficiently than men do and, once again,
> size
> > <> does NOT matter :P
> > <>
> > <>
> > <
> > <Not only was your terminology wrong, but so were your conclusions.  Here
> are
> > <some I just dug up.  In the following 12 subjects, no country scored
> lower
> > <than American 12th Grade Girls who scored:
> >
> > What Johnny isn't telling you is that he "just" dug these up years ago,
> > and has been drawing erroneous conclusions ever since.  For example
> > he also is not telling you that:
> >
> > <
> > <Zero percent of American 12th grade girls correctly solved TIMSS math
> > <problems.
> > <
> > <Zero percent of American 12th grade girls correctly solved TIMSS physics
> > <problems.
> > <
> >
> > that I have twice in the past demonstrated that  his "method" of
> "analysis"
> > which "led" to the above "conclusions" would also "lead"  to the
> "conclusions"
> > that:
> >
> >     a.  anyone answering all questions correctly should receive a
> >         mark of only 80%, and
> >
> >     b. five out of every four girls got one question wrong.  Can
> >        you say reduction ad absurdem?
> >
> > It's not the girls who can't apply math correctly.
> >
> >
> > Google has it.
> >
> >
> >
> > -- cary
> 
> 
> Let's use a simple example of how wrong you are, cary.
> 
> Question K09 on the 12th Grade TIMSS Math test given to 12th graders around
> the world in 1995 reveals an astounding difference in math skills between
> the sexes in all the countries who participated.  The average difference in
> all countries was 10.5%, with 47.3% of boys and 36.8% of girls answering
> correctly, but the difference in the US was 22.1% (28.6% of girls and 50.7%
> of boys).   In countries like Cyprus where 60.1% of the boys answered
> correctly, guesses on the test would not have influenced the scores by that
> much, but where only 28.6% of American girls answered correctly, guesses
> must be taken into account.
> 
> Since this was a multiple choice question with four possible choices, the
> probability of getting the correct answer just by guessing is 25%.  In other
> words, for every four students who guessed, one of them would have gotten
> the correct answer by chance.  The maximum score would have been achieved
> had all the students who didn't understand the problem guessed at the
> answer, so where 28.6% of American girls answered the problem correctly,
> 23.8% of them got the correct answer by guessing, and 4.8% indicated that
> they understood the problem [x = total guesses, 0.25x = correct guesses,
> 0.75x = incorrect guesses = 71.4%, x = 95.2%, 0.25x = 23.8%, 28.6% got the
> correct answer - 23.8% guessed the correct answer = 4.8% understood the
> problem].  However, with an estimated error of plus or minus 3%, only 1.8%
> are known with certainty to have understood the problem.
> 
> American boys didn't do that much better, since [prior to the adjustment for
> the 3% error] just 34.3% of them got the correct answer because they
> understood the problem, 16.4% got the correct answer because they guessed,
> and 49.3% guessed incorrectly. Thus only 31.3% are known with certainty to
> have understood the problem.
> 
> Prior to adjustment for the 3% error, 53.2% of the boys in Cyprus guessed,
> 39.9% guessed incorrectly, 13.3% guessed correctly, and 46.8% understood the
> problem [x = total guesses, 0.25x = correct guesses, 0.75x = incorrect
> guesses = 39.9%, x = 53.2%, 0.25x = 13.3%, and 60.1% correct answers - 13.3%
> correct guesses = 46.8% who understood the problem].  Only 43.8% are known
> with certainty to have understood the problem, so per capita, compared to
> American boys 40% more boys in Cyprus are known to have understood the
> problem, and compared to American girls, 24 times as many were.  Compared to
> American girls, 17 times as many American boys are known to have understood
> the problem.
> 
> Is this adequate proof that our attempt to establish "gender equality" is a
> failure?  Yes.  To achieve that ephemeral goal, our "educators began an
> unnecessary and destructive "gender war" of unprecedented proportions, more
> than doubled education spending as a percent of GDP, and out-spent by more
> than three times countries whose students far outperformed ours.  Japan,
> whose 8th graders scored 105 points higher than ours, spends half as much
> for education.  Korea, whose 8th graders scored 107 points higher than ours,
> spends even less per student than Japan.
> http://christianparty.net/timssgeometry.htm
> 
>

This is because parents assume a larger portion of the
cost of education than they do in the United States.  
In most other countries, parents have to buy 
all their children's school books, supplies, uniforms, 
plus pay for transportation to and from school. No school
buses subsidized by the community or free lunch
programs. There goes part of your theory.  Anyone else 
want to trash the rest of it?



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