brain sizes: Einstein's and women's

Lush jm55 at nospambigpond.net.au
Mon Jul 22 03:52:54 EST 2002



--
Lush

Lush-O-Mint: Double Yer Pleasure, Double Yer Fun


Parse Tree <parsetree at hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:RYFZ8.8274$QY4.1373806 at news20.bellglobal.com...
> "John Knight" <johnknight at usa.com> wrote in message
> news:HGFZ8.7230$Fq6.531196 at news2.west.cox.net...
> >
> > "Jet" <thatjetnospam at yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:3D364DCC.FD04A773 at yahoo.com...
> > > >   If they didn't have the wrong information, or didn't make an error,
> > > > >then of the 30% who got it correct, 23% would have gotten it correct
> > because
> > > > >they guessed, and only 7% would have gotten it correct because they
> > > > >understood the problem [ x = total guesses, 0.25x = correct guesses
> > 0.75x =
> > > > >wrong guesses = 70%, x = .93, 0.25x = .23 = correct guesses, correct
> > total
> > > > >answers of 30% - 23% correct guesses = 7% (those who knew the
> > problem)].
> > > >
> > > > You cannot determine the percentage who guessed.  You persist in
> > assuming
> > > > that everyone who got the answer wrong guessed randomly, and there is
> no
> > > > evidence of this.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Let's look at his algebra. He states x = total guesses, and 0.25x =
> > > correct guesses 0.75 x= wrong guesses.
> > >
> > > He then figures that 0.75 x= 70%, and thus x = .93.
> > >
> > > BUT, if we figure .25 x= 30%, x=1.20. We have x with two different
> > > values!
> > >
> > > LOL.
> > >
> > > J
> >
> >
> > My, my, Jet, you're really working overtime to try to prove the point of
> > this thread, aren't you?  Two stabs at it so far, and you're still off by
> a
> > mile.
> >
> > Don't ask anybody for the answer, ok?  This is a closed book quiz.
> Scout's
> > honor?
> >
> > John Knight
> >
> >
> >
> > ps--this "math problem" actually is about as simple as many of the TIMSS
> > questions where less than zero percent of American girls got the correct
> > answer, once adjusted for guesses.  But then, Jet also claims that she
> never
> > guesses on multiple choice questions.
> > http://christianparty.net/timssphysics.htm
>
> Item G11:
> The water level in a small aquarium reaches up to a mark A. After a large
> ice cube is dropped into the water, the cube floats and the water level
> rises to a new mark B. What will happen to the water level as the ice melts?
> Explain your reasoning.
>
> I am actually curious as to what the answer to this question is.  Will the
> volume of ice, which is greater than that of water offset the parts of the
> ice that are above water?
>
>

If my memory serves me correctly, when I add icecubes to a summer drink the level of the liquid in
the glass rises.





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