brain sizes: Einstein's and women's--jet

John Knight johnknight at usa.com
Thu Jul 25 20:10:01 EST 2002


"Parse Tree" <parsetree at hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:oqZ%8.9057$DN4.1608355 at news20.bellglobal.com...
> "John Knight" <johnknight at usa.com> wrote in message
> news:_2W%8.20049$Fq6.2409696 at news2.west.cox.net...
> >
> >
> > "mat" <mats_trash at hotmail.com> wrote in message > > So let's make it
REAL
> > simple. Let's define a simple statement of the
> > > > problem.
> > > >
> > > > If you have 100,000 students *randomly guessing* at one multiple
> choice
> > > > question which has four possible answers (A., B., C., and D.), one
of
> > which
> > > > must be selected, then there is only ONE possible outcome:
> > > >
> > > > A. gets selected 25,000 times.
> > > >
> > > > B. gets selected 25,000 times.
> > > >
> > > > C. gets selected 25,000 times.
> > > >
> > > > D. gets selected 25,000 times.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Your contradicting yourself and you don't even realise it.  Given that
> > > the students are guessing 'randomly' then it is by no means certain
> > > that anything of the sort you describe is going to happen (thats what
> > > random means).  What probability tells you is what is more or less
> > > likely to happen and what would happen as sample size and repetition
> > > tends toward infinity
> > >
> >
> > Mat, this is getting to be a waste of time.  You're actually going
> > BACKWARDS, adding to the negative knowledge, and confusing more people
> than
> > just yourself.
> >
> > If you don't believe the above is precisely what will happen (plus or
> minus
> > 0.75%), then exactly what do you *think* will happen.  Be specific, and
> tell
> > us exactly why you *think* that.
> >
> > This is fundamental to getting the rest correct, so please don't go
> blasting
> > off into territory that is clearly going to confuse the issue, and focus
> > only on the above.
> >
> > Tell us why the above won't be the outcome, and tell us what you *think*
> it
> > will be instead.
>
> I have already explained why the above isn't true.  Additionally, I have
> found the ACTUAL answer.
>
> See another post where I calculate the probability that 1 person will
guess
> uniformly for the four questions.
>
>

As usual, you're answering the WRONG question.

Answer the question above.

What could be THAT difficult about it?

If the following is wrong, PROVE that it's wrong, and post the CORRECT final
answer, not your whacked out, misleading, and errroneous "theories":

> > > > If you have 100,000 students *randomly guessing* at one multiple
> choice
> > > > question which has four possible answers (A., B., C., and D.), one
of
> > which
> > > > must be selected, then there is only ONE possible outcome:
> > > >
> > > > A. gets selected 25,000 times.
> > > >
> > > > B. gets selected 25,000 times.
> > > >
> > > > C. gets selected 25,000 times.
> > > >
> > > > D. gets selected 25,000 times.

The problem is that you probably know, or at least sense, that the above is
right, but continue on this feminazi rant just because of that missing 3 1/2
billion brain cells.

John Knight






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