brain sizes: Einstein's and women's

Cary Kittrell cary at afone.as.arizona.edu
Fri Jul 26 12:59:35 EST 2002


In article <DrJ%8.18120$Fq6.2234553 at news2.west.cox.net> "John Knight" <johnknight at usa.com> writes:
<
<"Cary Kittrell" <cary at afone.as.arizona.edu> wrote in message
<news:ahne76$fqb$1 at oasis.ccit.arizona.edu...
<> In article <HBG%8.17949$Fq6.2185466 at news2.west.cox.net> "John Knight"
<<johnknight at usa.com> writes:
<> <
<> <"Cary Kittrell" <cary at afone.as.arizona.edu> wrote in message
<> <news:ahmuii$7mj$1 at oasis.ccit.arizona.edu...
<> <> In article  "John Knight" <johnknight at usa.com> writes:
<> <> <west.cox.net> <ah46lo$qcu45$1 at ID-150265.news.dfncis.de>
<> <<GGoZ8.5881$Fq6.333515 at news2.west.cox.net> <3D364506.68C7F9B9 at yahoo.com>
<> <<ah73mn$dr3$1 at oasis.ccit.arizona.edu>
<> <<4SEZ8.446$sR2.9177 at news4.ulv.nextra.no> <3D37BEC6.77D62C86 at yahoo.com>
<> <<ce660175.0207201
<> <> <
<> <> <
<> <> <"Cary Kittrell" <cary at afone.as.arizona.edu> wrote in message
<> <> <news:ahkjf2$rvp$1 at oasis.ccit.arizona.edu...
<> <> <>
<> <> <> In article  "Parse Tree" <parsetree at hotmail.com> writes:
<> <>
<> <>             {...}
<> <> <> <
<> <> <> <The initial spring tension is unknown.  You're assuming that the
<> <bottom
<> <> <> <sphere is suspended from the top one.  It simply says that it's
<> <suspended
<> <> <at
<> <> <> <rest.  Which could simply mean that the system is suspended at
<rest.
<> <Who
<> <> <> <knows?  Actually, I find many of these questions to be very
<imprecise.
<> <> <> <
<> <> <> <Regardless, the acceleration of the system is g.  And the
<acceleration
<> <of
<> <> <> <all of the parts are g.  Thus the string's tension should be 0.
<> <> <>
<> <> <> Assuming an infinitely strong string -- one whose relaxation is
<zero --
<> <> <then
<> <> <> you are correct.
<> <> <>
<> <> <>
<> <> <> -- cary
<> <> <>
<> <> <>
<> <> <
<> <> <Every bit of information that's required to answer the quesion
<correctly
<> <was
<> <> <provided.  There's nothing about the string being "infinitely strong",
<> <and
<> <> <in fact the question specifically states that it's a "light string",
<> <cary!
<> <> <
<> <>
<> <> Well then, obviously none of the given answers is technically correct,
<is
<> <> it?
<> <>
<> <> Of course it's clear what the designers of the test had in mind, but
<> <> if one wants to get all geeky about it, you need the Young's modulus of
<> <> the "light string" for a more correct approximation.  And then you
<> <> need to apply further corrections for tidal effects.  And then
<> <> there are tiny General Relativistic corrections beyond all that.
<> <>
<> <> Clearly the question wasn't looking for any of this, but Parse Tree
<> <> and I are just having a bit of fun playing with it.  Come on
<> <> in John, any number can play: let's hear your discussion of the physics
<> <> involved.  Here, use this space:
<> <>
<> <
<> <Not only did the test question not ask for all that, not only is it
<> <irrelevant to answering the question, not only have you already SEEN the
<> <correct answer, but you're answering the wrong question.
<> <
<> <The correct answer would be the one that addresses what you believe it is
<> <about American 12th grade girls that their correct answers to ONE THIRD
<of
<> <these questions were lower than if they'd just guessed.  Not just a
<little
<> <bit lower, but a LOT lower.  Not just a few questions like this simple
<one,
<> <but ONE THIRD of them.
<> <
<> <Unless your muddling around like this is intended to demonstrate the
<mental
<> <process that you think might have been involved, you're ignoring the most
<> <important question.
<> <
<>
<> Can't do it, eh?
<>
<> Imagine my surprise.
<>
<>
<> -- cary
<
<Why should anyone participate in your attempt to sidetrack the discussion,
<cary?  The answer to the question was posted days ago, the links to the
<answer sheet were posted weeks ago, but even if you were to ever figure it
<out, it's still completely irrelevant to the point of the thread.
<
<Tell us why you believe that GRE Quantitative scores and the 1995 TIMSS Math
<scores correlate so closely with brain size, as well as with incomes, crime
<rates, SAT Math scores, IAEP Math scores, GRE Analytical and Verbal scores,
<the 1999 TIMSS scores, etc.
<http://christianparty.net/grebrainsizegraphs.htm
<
<Or, conversely, tell us why you believe that American 12th grade girls
<scored lower than if they'd just guessed on a THIRD of the questions at
<http://christianparty.net/timssphysics.htm
<

Can't do it, eh?

Imagine my surprise.


-- cary




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