Backward propagation

Kenneth Collins k.p.collins at worldnet.att.net
Tue Nov 5 18:51:03 EST 2002


One aspect of the work I do does have a wuality of "Backward
propagation" to it.

It's that I go back over all the stuff that coersed-consensus
dictates "is too trivial" to consider, and Consider it, as far into
its depths that I can drag myself.

I'll give a few examples.

The way that heart-rate and rate of blood flow waxes and wains in way
that's correlated to physical demands is just more TD
E/I-minimization. Reduced oxygen-content elevates TD E/I. Elevated TD
E/I increases heart rate, which enables the body to do the work
entailed in this or that problem that's been encountered. The work
accomplished removes the problematic stuff, which, 'simultaneously'
eliminates the TD E/I(up) that the problem stuff imposed upon neural
activation dynamics.

Hhunger, thirst, and other drives are exactly the same-stuff, except
that they're generated internally, which means that their correlated
mocular stuff reduces, directly, to TD E/I-minimization.

Even simple stuff like the so-called "logarithmic" impulse-coding of
neural-activation "power" directly reflects the "fundamental wisdom"
that TD E/I must be minimized if survival is to be achieved. The
nonlinear coding efficiently impliments TD E/I in terms of TD
E/I-minimization.

Everywhere one looks within nervous systems, it's all the same-stuff,
albeit, rigorously embedded within the awesomely-elegant neural
topology that's discussed in AoK, and in more detail, in any good
Neuroanatomy textbook.

The only 'trick', here, consists of realizing that there's nothing
'trivial' within nervous systems, nor in the by-products of the TD
E/I-minimization that occurs within them.

So, if "you've" been victimized by the coersed-consensus stuff that
'teaches' that this or that is "too trivial to consider", do some
work to escape 'your' victimization.

If 'you' do, "you'll" find that there's True-Wonder stuff where
coersed-consensus 'taught' 'disdain'.

Then, comprehend TD E/I-minimization, and the nervous system's stuff
just implode to unity.

It's a useful guide especially with respect to work that remains to
be accomplished in Neuroscience - in all of Biology [and other
Sciences].

k. p. collins





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