sluggish schizophrenia

Allen L. Barker alb at datafilter.com
Mon Nov 18 22:06:28 EST 2002


[Sorry, I posted to all groups at once instead of separately...]

Anyone know any TV shows about sluggish schizophrenia?
Any board games about US nonconsensual experimentation?
I heard something about Bluebird, MKULTRA, and MKSEARCH; anyone
know anything?

-------------

"Mad Scientist" Paul Hoch:
http://www.levity.com/aciddreams/samples/madscientist.html

[...]

("It is possible that a certain amount of brain damage is of
therapeutic value," Hoch once stated.) In one experiment a
hallucinogen was administered along with a local
anesthetic and the subject was told to describe his visual
experiences as surgeons removed chunks of his cerebral
cortex.

[...]


See also:
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=23489

-------------



Mad Russians by Victoria Pope
U.S. News & World Report
http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=5rvlvq%24l9m%241%40news.missouri.edu
12-16-1996 pp. 38-43
Victims of Soviet 'punitive psychiatry' continue to pay a heavy price

[...]

Today, Russia's state center for forensic psychiatry is still the Serbsky
Institute, where psychiatrists once examined thousands of political
dissidents whom they deemed mentally unfit. One favorite diagnosis:
vyalotekushchaya, or "sluggish schizophrenia," a clinical term coined at
Serbsky to explain why someone with such a disorder might appear normal most
of the time. One manifestation of this novel ailment was "stubbornness and
inflexibility of convictions"; the usual treatment consisted of megadoses of
powerful tranquilizers like Thorazine for "prophylactic" purposes.
"Reformist delusions" were an indication of "paranoid development," the
other blanket diagnosis used for dissenters.

[...]

Once in the hospitals, many prisoners say, they were forced to admit they
were mentally ill to avoid hellishly painful injections that at times were
so potent a patient would faint and need reviving with an oxygen mask.
Mikhail Kukobaka, a Belarussian worker arrested for organizing an election
boycott, recalls how the pressure to give in was particularly fierce when he
was held in the 1970s at Sychyovka, a special hospital near the Russian city
of Smolensk. "The nurses were criminals from the neighboring prison," he
says, sucking in his breath. "There were injections. Murders. They beat
people to death. " Kukobaka attributes his heart problems to the unrelieved
tension of incarceration. He is stuck with the diagnosis of schizophrenia
but says he will never ask for official rehabilitation. To prove he has full
command of his faculties, he has chronicled his prison experiences in
several essays. That is vindication enough, he says.

Prisoners who repeatedly refused to recant paid dearly. "They would take
this canvas material, 20 meters of it on a roll, and you were bandaged, and
water was poured on you," says Antonas Bagdonas, recollecting Kazan in the
1950s. The swaddling would then dry and constrict. "The circulation would
stop and the person lost consciousness," he adds. The old man's body is
evidence enough of the torture: It is crisscrossed with scars. He survived,
he said, only because other prisoners massaged his wounds with oil. The past
bleeds into the present, and he lives in fear that his old captors will
trace him.

[...]


--
Mind Control: TT&P ==> http://www.datafilter.com/mc
Allen Barker



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