brain sizes: Einstein's and women's

The 9th Witch Thec at inthe.net
Sun Sep 1 19:10:31 EST 2002


On Sun, 01 Sep 2002 15:27:11 GMT, "John Knight" <jwknight at polbox.com>
yelled from the fourth floor ward window, and subsequently was
sedated:

Did you even bother to read this far, idiot?


*>      Being both Irish and Jewish, I grew up familiar with customs
and =
*>the cultures of both peoples, only in later years becoming aware
that =
*>they were quite difference cultures and had greatly varying cultural
=
*>characteristics. Yet growing up with both cultures, I had noticed =
*>similarities even on a casual basis. Over the years I began to see
more =
*>of this similarity and in recent years I began to collect this data
into =
*>what I term an Overview which I am still assembling. It is this
Overview =
*>in differing areas of life that I will discuss here.
*>
*>      There are a number of areas that I have been looking at which
=
*>includes: language, agriculture, religion and taboos, burial
practices, =
*>music and folk dancing, the traditions and self determinations and =
*>self-identification of the Celts and other areas as the arise. I
will =
*>point out a few items in each category and note that these are just
a =
*>few of a great many commonalities and I mention them as examples.
*>
*>      Language is one of the subjects that led to my overall
interest in =
*>the topic as early on I had noticed similarities. Considering the
long =
*>period of time from the expulsion of the Israelites to our time, it
=
*>would seem unlikely that there would be little, if any, common
letters, =
*>words or structure, but that is not the case - there is indeed much
in =
*>common.
*>
*>      Gaelic is a member of the Celtic group of the Indo-European
family =
*>of languages that includes Russian, English, German, Spanish,
French, =
*>Hindi and Italian. The Celtic group has been confined to the British
=
*>Isles and part of the French coast.
*>
*>      Linguistic Similarities
*>      The Celtic group is divided into two divisions which has three
=
*>languages in each division. Each division makes up its own unique =
*>language.The two branches are:
*>
*>        a.. the BRYTHONIC branch which is made up of the Welsh,
Breton =
*>and Cornish lan guages; and=20
*>        b.. the GOIDELIC branch with the Irish, Scots and Manx
Gaelic =
*>languages.=20
*>      The Breton and Cornish languages are seeing some resurgence
after =
*>near extinction while the Irish, Scots and Welsh languages are
holding =
*>their own at this time. Manx is an ancient form of Irish and is =
*>considered to be oldest and purest Irish Gaelic in existence. Manx
is =
*>very close to the extinct dialects of nearby Ulster and Galloway and
=
*>separated from Old Irish in about the fifth century of our era. It =
*>occupies much the same position to Old Irish as Icelandic does to
Old =
*>Norse. For the purpose of my study I have chose to concentrate on
Manx =
*>and Scots Gaelic. I am sure though that an indepth study of Welsh or
the =
*>other Gaelic languages would provide much food for thought on this =
*>issue.
*>
*>      The Gaelic alphabet as well as the ordinal numbers show more =
*>commonality than could be expected after 2,700 years of divergence;
for =
*>example we have a Hebrew "S" retained in the modern Gaelic - the
Hebrew =
*>Sheen, pronounced Shh is found in the Irish "S" as in the name Sean
=
*>pronounced Shawn. Other letters are similar, the ordinal numbers 6 &
7 =
*>are pronounced almost the same as Hebrew and Gaelic. Words with same
or =
*>similar meanings abound; for instance the Hebrew word for holy in
common =
*>usage according to Halacha (Jewish law) is Kasher. The word in Manx
=
*>Gaelic for hallowed or holy is Casherick. The syntax of Gaelic is =
*>entirely different from any other European language, especially
English. =
*>RL Thompson, in his work Outline of Manx Literature and Language
says =
*>that "in several respects Gaelic syntax has similarities with that
of =
*>languages like Hebrew and Arabic".
*>
*>      As in Hebrew, adjectives follow the noun that they describe:
for =
*>example "ben vie" =3D "a good woman" in Gaelic and "Rosh ketan" =3D
=
*>"small head" or "stupid" in Hebrew. Vie of ketan being the
adjectives. =
*>The word order also is similar in Hebrew in that the verb is usually
=
*>first in the sentence unlike English or many other European
languages. =
*>These are just a very few of the many commonalities that I believe =
*>suggest a definite connection between the two languages and their
family =
*>streams. This alone could constitute a major comparative study.
*>
*>      Commonalities in Ethnic Customs=20
*>
*>      One of the first areas in which I noticed similarities was in
=
*>customs, notably folk dancing and later, musical instruments. The
Hebrew =
*>Hora and other old traditional dances are parallelled in many Gaelic
=
*>folk dances and especially the wedding dance of the Gaels which is
very =
*>similar to the traditional Ashkenazic wedding dances of Europe. The
=
*>musical instruments of the Gaels are found in the Israelite
tradition, =
*>notably the harp in both Celtic tales and certainly Hebrew tradition
as =
*>the favoured instrument of the psalmist David [see the article "The
Harp =
*>of David and the Harp of Ireland" by John Wheeler in the
August-October =
*>issue of Origins of Nations - ed]. But, one of the most intriguing =
*>things to come up was that the Irish and Scots pipes we are all
familiar =
*>with has its origins in the desert flute played daily throughout\t
the =
*>Middle East. The flute of the desert shepherds is identifiable in
the =
*>"chanter" of the Irish and Scots pipes.
*>
*>      Amazing Religious Parallels=20
*>
*>      The ancient religion of the Celtic peoples prior to
Christianity =
*>was generally believed to be Druidism, of which we know very little;
yet =
*>that which we do know has many overtones of the Canaanite religions
that =
*>the northern tribes turned to after the split of King Solomon's
Kingdom =
*>under his son into a Northern and a Southern Kingdom. Like the
pagans of =
*>Canaan, their sacred places became high hilltops and sacred groves,
=
*>notably oaks. There is a great deal of similarities from what we
know =
*>archaeologically in both the Northern Kingdom ritual sites and the
Druid =
*>sites in the Isles. Additionally, the burial practices of both the =
*>peoples of the northern Kingdom and the Celts bear much similarity
in =
*>the presence of Dolmens - large slabs of stone place horizontally
across =
*>upright stones with the graves under them. These are found
throughout =
*>the area of Europe which Celtic peoples passed and are found also in
the =
*>areas of present day Jordan and Israel in which the Northern
Israelite =
*>tribes dwelled.
*>
*>      You can find pictures of these dolmens in Yair Davidy's book =
*>Ephraim on pages 137-38. This book is available from History
Research =
*>Projects. Overseas it may be purchased direct from Yair Davidy in =
*>Israel.
*>
*>      Even Agricultural Similarities!
*>      Agriculturally there are interesting commonalities - the grain
=
*>crops are much the same, and even though wheat was known to them in
=
*>their passage through Europe it was not a major crop in their final
=
*>homes. In fact oats and barley were their staple grains. As with the
=
*>Israelites, the cattle were of several colours, but the preferred
colour =
*>for ritual for both peoples was red. The virgin cow used in the
Hebrew =
*>ritual for purification was the forerunner of the red cattle used by
the =
*>Druids in their rituals.
*>
*>      After the invasion of the Romans into the Isles, white cattle
were =
*>introduced and later used; until that time red was the preferred
colour. =
*>One of the most famous wars in Irish history was over a Red Bull
stolen =
*>by a northern Irish tribe. Also, swine were not raised in any of the
=
*>early Celtic areas until after they were introduced by the Romans;
the =
*>Celts had a taboo against them, along with scaleless fish as eels
and =
*>shellfish. The Celts, in similitude to the Israelites, were
excellent =
*>headsman and developed identifiable breeds of sheep, cattle and
horses, =
*>that carried on the traditions of the Israelites.
*>
*>      Other Proofs=20
*>
*>      Perhaps one of the most telling of the commonalities is simply
the =
*>self-identification as Israelites - the Hibernians - the name of the
=
*>Irish and the Scots and the Hebrides Islands off the coast of
Scotland. =
*>The Milesians, one of the early Celtic peoples to come to Ireland
from =
*>Spain had a tradition that they were of the Lost Tribes. The name
Heber, =
*>Eber, or H'berian is found throughout early literature to describe
the =
*>Celts as they described themselves to be "Of Eber" - the grandfather
of =
*>Abraham.
*>
*>      What I have presented here in greatly abbreviated form just
skims =
*>the surface of the commonalities between the Celtic Peoples and the
=
*>Israelites. There is a tremendous amount of information available
for =
*>those who would like to look at this closer themselves. A few
resources =
*>are listed at the end. This is one of those subjects in which at
first =
*>one can say "oh - that's an interesting coincidence". But the sheer
mass =
*>of these "coincidences" that build up after one goes from discipline
to =
*>another becomes totally overwhelming. The fact that so much of the =
*>languages are similar almost three thousand years later, that
customs =
*>are clearly identifiable as being related, that religious practices
are =
*>uniquely similar and that the everyday agricultural practices and
crops =
*>were similar - all along with the many other commonalities bespeak a
=
*>common origin.
*>
*>      For those interested in pursuing this I wish you well and much
=
*>enjoyment.
*>
*>
*>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
*>-
*>
*>      Suggested information sources:=20
*>
*>      Manx Gaelic Society
*>      Yn Cheshaght Ghailckagh
*>      St Judes
*>      Isle of Man IM7 2EW
*>      United Kingdom
*>
*>      Gaelic Books Council
*>      Dept of Celtic
*>      University of Glasgow
*>      Glasgow G12 8QQ
*>      Scotland
*>
*>      Yair Davidy
*>      Brit-Am
*>      PO Box 595
*>      Jerusalem
*>      Israel 91004
*>
*>
*>      Chadwick, N (1965) Celtic Britain. London.
*>      Chadwick, N (1970) The Celts. United Kingdom.
*>      Rankin, H (1987) Celts and the Classical World. London.
*>      Squire, C (1905) Celtic Myth and Legend, Poetry and Romance. =
*>London.
*>      Squire, C (1909) The Mythology of Ancient Britain and Ireland.
=
*>London.
*>
*>
*>-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
*>-
*>
*>      Editorial=20
*>
*>      In Brief
*>
*>        a.. Cultural Links Between the Israelites and Myceneans=20
*>        b.. Westminster Abbey=20
*>        c.. Elam's Volatile Relationship with Israelitish Nations=20
*>        d.. Who are the East Asians, Polynesians and American
Indians?=20
*>        e.. Ephraim=20
*>      The Chaldeans
*>    =20
*>
*>
*>------=_NextPart_000_004E_01C25191.5D636CE0
*>Content-Type: text/html;
*>	charset="iso-8859-1"
*>Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
*>
*><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
*><HTML><HEAD>
*><META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html; =
*>charset=3Diso-8859-1">
*><META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.2719.2200" name=3DGENERATOR>
*><STYLE></STYLE>
*></HEAD>
*><BODY>
*><DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>"Zayton" &lt;</FONT><A=20
*>href=3D"mailto:zayton at bellsouth.net"><FONT face=3DArial=20
*>size=3D2>zayton at bellsouth.net</FONT></A><FONT face=3DArial
size=3D2>&gt; =
*>wrote in=20
*>message </FONT><A=20
*>href=3D"news:AF5c9.7167$vY2.161743 at e3500-atl2.usenetserver.com"><FONT
=
*>face=3DArial=20
*>size=3D2>news:AF5c9.7167$vY2.161743 at e3500-atl2.usenetserver.com</FONT></A=
*>><FONT=20
*>face=3DArial size=3D2>...<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; John Knight =
*>wrote:<BR>&gt;=20
*>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; Most of the
White =
*>Races of=20
*>the world are descendants of the<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt;
Israelites,<BR>&gt; =
*>&gt; &gt;=20
*>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; &gt;=20
*>Nonsense.<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; =
*>&gt;<BR>&gt; &gt;=20
*>&gt; &gt; &gt; Bob<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; =
*>&gt;<BR>&gt;=20
*>&gt; &gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; The reason the White Race in
the =
*>US is=20
*>referred to as "Caucasians" is<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt; because they
were =
*>the=20
*>Israelites who were dispersed to the Caucasus<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; &gt;
=
*>Mountains,=20
*>who went from there throughout Europe.<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt;
&gt;<BR>&gt; =
*>&gt; &gt;=20
*>&gt; You didn't know that?<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; This
is a =
*>lie,=20
*>John.<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; &gt; Joe<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; =
*>&gt;<BR>&gt;=20
*>&gt; Really?&nbsp; Where did White Europeans come from?<BR>&gt;
<BR>&gt; =
*>
*>Certainly not from Israel.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;&nbsp; Where did the =
*>White<BR>&gt;=20
*>&gt; Israelites go?<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; What "white
Israelites?<BR>&gt;=20
*><BR></FONT></DIV>
*><DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
*><DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
*><DIV><A=20
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p3.html">http://cgca=
*>.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p3.html</A>=20
*>
*><TABLE cellSpacing=3D0 cellPadding=3D0 width=3D"100%" border=3D0>
*>  <TBODY>
*>  <TR>
*>    <TD vAlign=3Dtop msnavigation>
*>      <P><A name=3Dtop></A></P>
*>      <H3 align=3Dcenter><FONT color=3D#000080>CELTIC-ISRAELITE=20
*>      COMMONALITIES</FONT></H3>
*>      <H4 align=3Dcenter><FONT color=3D#000080>by Yaacov =
*>Levi</FONT></H4>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>To many who are interested in the
history =
*>of the=20
*>      Celtic peoples and their modern descendants in Ireland, Wales,
=
*>Scotland,=20
*>      Brittany and Cornwall, and from their descendants around the
world =
*>a=20
*>      subject that is often brought up is possible connections with
the =
*>ancient=20
*>      Israelites, in particular the "Lost Tribes" of
Israel.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>The purpose of this article is not to
=
*>establish=20
*>      'connections' to the Lost Tribes, but to discuss some of the
many =
*>common=20
*>      characteristics of these modern Celtic peoples and the ancient
=
*>Israelites.=20
*>      These characteristics I call Commonalities. I am not
attempting in =
*>this=20
*>      short article to establish connections which has been
addressed in =
*>many=20
*>      other volumes such as <I>The Tribes</I> and <I>Ephraim</I> by
Yair =
*>Davidy=20
*>      and <I>The Lost Tribes of Israel - Found</I>! by Steven
Collins as =
*>well as=20
*>      in ancient works. I am simply going to point out and discuss a
=
*>very few of=20
*>      the great many commonalities between these peoples.</FONT></P>
*>      <P align=3Dcenter><B><FONT color=3D#000080>The Lost Tribes of
The =
*>House of=20
*>      Israel</FONT></B> </P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>The peoples we refer to as the Lost =
*>Tribes were=20
*>      part of the Northern Kingdom of Israel which was conquered by
the=20
*>      Assyrians around 740-720 BC. and exiled to areas in Assyria
and to =
*>the=20
*>      north. This is told in the the Bible in 2Kings chapters 17 and
18. =
*>About=20
*>      the same time a contingent from the Kingdom of Judah were also
=
*>exiled to=20
*>      the northern lands. It is these peoples and their immediate =
*>descendants=20
*>      that are also variously referred to as the Lost Tribes, and
the =
*>subject of=20
*>      many works and studies.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>Being both Irish and Jewish, I grew
up =
*>familiar=20
*>      with customs and the cultures of both peoples, only in later
years =
*>
*>      becoming aware that they were quite difference cultures and
had =
*>greatly=20
*>      varying cultural characteristics. Yet growing up with both =
*>cultures, I had=20
*>      noticed similarities even on a casual basis. Over the years I
=
*>began to see=20
*>      more of this similarity and in recent years I began to collect
=
*>this data=20
*>      into what I term an Overview which I am still assembling. It
is =
*>this=20
*>      Overview in differing areas of life that I will discuss =
*>here.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>There are a number of areas that I
have =
*>been=20
*>      looking at which includes: language, agriculture, religion and
=
*>taboos,=20
*>      burial practices, music and folk dancing, the traditions and
self=20
*>      determinations and self-identification of the Celts and other
=
*>areas as the=20
*>      arise. I will point out a few items in each category and note
that =
*>these=20
*>      are just a few of a great many commonalities and I mention
them as =
*>
*>      examples.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>Language is one of the subjects that
led =
*>to my=20
*>      overall interest in the topic as early on I had noticed =
*>similarities.=20
*>      Considering the long period of time from the expulsion of the
=
*>Israelites=20
*>      to our time, it would seem unlikely that there would be
little, if =
*>any,=20
*>      common letters, words or structure, but that is not the case -
=
*>there is=20
*>      indeed much in common.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>Gaelic is a member of the Celtic
group of =
*>the=20
*>      Indo-European family of languages that includes Russian,
English, =
*>German,=20
*>      Spanish, French, Hindi and Italian. The Celtic group has been
=
*>confined to=20
*>      the British Isles and part of the French coast.</FONT></P>
*>      <H4 align=3Dcenter><FONT color=3D#000080>Linguistic =
*>Similarities</FONT></H4>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>The Celtic group is divided into two
=
*>divisions=20
*>      which has three languages in each division. Each division
makes up =
*>its own=20
*>      unique language.The two branches are:</FONT>
*>      <UL>
*>        <LI><FONT color=3D#000080>the <B>BRYTHONIC</B> branch which
is =
*>made up of=20
*>        the Welsh, Breton and Cornish lan guages; and</FONT> </LI>
*>        <LI><FONT color=3D#000080>the <B>GOIDELIC</B> branch with
the =
*>Irish, Scots=20
*>        and Manx Gaelic languages.</FONT> </LI></UL>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>The Breton and Cornish languages are
=
*>seeing some=20
*>      resurgence after near extinction while the Irish, Scots and
Welsh=20
*>      languages are holding their own at this time. Manx is an
ancient =
*>form of=20
*>      Irish and is considered to be oldest and purest Irish Gaelic
in =
*>existence.=20
*>      Manx is very close to the extinct dialects of nearby Ulster
and =
*>Galloway=20
*>      and separated from Old Irish in about the fifth century of our
=
*>era. It=20
*>      occupies much the same position to Old Irish as Icelandic does
to =
*>Old=20
*>      Norse. For the purpose of my study I have chose to concentrate
on =
*>Manx and=20
*>      Scots Gaelic. I am sure though that an indepth study of Welsh
or =
*>the other=20
*>      Gaelic languages would provide much food for thought on
this=20
*>      issue.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>The Gaelic alphabet as well as the =
*>ordinal numbers=20
*>      show more commonality than could be expected after 2,700 years
of=20
*>      divergence; for example we have a Hebrew "S" retained in the =
*>modern Gaelic=20
*>      - the Hebrew Sheen, pronounced Shh is found in the Irish "S"
as in =
*>the=20
*>      name Sean pronounced Shawn. Other letters are similar, the
ordinal =
*>numbers=20
*>      6 &amp; 7 are pronounced almost the same as Hebrew and Gaelic.
=
*>Words with=20
*>      same or similar meanings abound; for instance the Hebrew word
for =
*>holy in=20
*>      common usage according to Halacha (Jewish law) is
<I>Kasher</I>. =
*>The word=20
*>      in Manx Gaelic for hallowed or holy is <I>Casherick</I>. The =
*>syntax of=20
*>      Gaelic is entirely different from any other European language,
=
*>especially=20
*>      English. RL Thompson, in his work <I>Outline of Manx
Literature =
*>and=20
*>      Language</I> says that "in several respects Gaelic syntax has
=
*>similarities=20
*>      with that of languages like Hebrew and Arabic".</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>As in Hebrew, adjectives follow the
noun =
*>that they=20
*>      describe: for example "ben vie" =3D "a good woman" in Gaelic
and =
*>"Rosh=20
*>      ketan" =3D "small head" or "stupid" in Hebrew. Vie of ketan
being =
*>the=20
*>      adjectives. The word order also is similar in Hebrew in that
the =
*>verb is=20
*>      usually first in the sentence unlike English or many other =
*>European=20
*>      languages. These are just a very few of the many commonalities
=
*>that I=20
*>      believe suggest a definite connection between the two
languages =
*>and their=20
*>      family streams. This alone could constitute a major
comparative=20
*>      study.</FONT></P>
*>      <P align=3Dcenter><B><FONT color=3D#000080>Commonalities in
Ethnic =
*>
*>      Customs</FONT></B> </P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>One of the first areas in which I
noticed =
*>
*>      similarities was in customs, notably folk dancing and later, =
*>musical=20
*>      instruments. The Hebrew <I>Hora</I> and other old traditional
=
*>dances are=20
*>      parallelled in many Gaelic folk dances and especially the
wedding =
*>dance of=20
*>      the Gaels which is very similar to the traditional Ashkenazic
=
*>wedding=20
*>      dances of Europe. The musical instruments of the Gaels are
found =
*>in the=20
*>      Israelite tradition, notably the harp in both Celtic tales and
=
*>certainly=20
*>      Hebrew tradition as the favoured instrument of the psalmist
David =
*>[see the=20
*>      article "The Harp of David and the Harp of Ireland" by John =
*>Wheeler in the=20
*>      August-October issue of <I>Origins of Nations</I> - ed]. But,
one =
*>of the=20
*>      most intriguing things to come up was that the Irish and Scots
=
*>pipes we=20
*>      are all familiar with has its origins in the desert flute
played =
*>daily=20
*>      throughout\t the Middle East. The flute of the desert
shepherds is =
*>
*>      identifiable in the "chanter" of the Irish and Scots =
*>pipes.</FONT></P>
*>      <P align=3Dcenter><B><FONT color=3D#000080>Amazing
Religious=20
*>      Parallels</FONT></B> </P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>The ancient religion of the Celtic =
*>peoples prior to=20
*>      Christianity was generally believed to be Druidism, of which
we =
*>know very=20
*>      little; yet that which we do know has many overtones of the =
*>Canaanite=20
*>      religions that the northern tribes turned to after the split
of =
*>King=20
*>      Solomon's Kingdom under his son into a Northern and a Southern
=
*>Kingdom.=20
*>      Like the pagans of Canaan, their sacred places became high =
*>hilltops and=20
*>      sacred groves, notably oaks. There is a great deal of
similarities =
*>from=20
*>      what we know archaeologically in both the Northern Kingdom
ritual =
*>sites=20
*>      and the Druid sites in the Isles. Additionally, the burial =
*>practices of=20
*>      both the peoples of the northern Kingdom and the Celts bear
much=20
*>      similarity in the presence of Dolmens - large slabs of stone
place =
*>
*>      horizontally across upright stones with the graves under them.
=
*>These are=20
*>      found throughout the area of Europe which Celtic peoples
passed =
*>and are=20
*>      found also in the areas of present day Jordan and Israel in
which =
*>the=20
*>      Northern Israelite tribes dwelled.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>You can find pictures of these
dolmens in =
*>Yair=20
*>      Davidy's book <I>Ephraim</I> on pages 137-38. This book is =
*>available from=20
*>      History Research Projects. Overseas it may be purchased direct
=
*>from Yair=20
*>      Davidy in Israel.</FONT></P>
*>      <H4 align=3Dcenter><FONT color=3D#000080>Even Agricultural=20
*>      Similarities!</FONT></H4>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>Agriculturally there are interesting
=
*>commonalities=20
*>      - the grain crops are much the same, and even though wheat was
=
*>known to=20
*>      them in their passage through Europe it was not a major crop
in =
*>their=20
*>      final homes. In fact oats and barley were their staple grains.
As =
*>with the=20
*>      Israelites, the cattle were of several colours, but the
preferred =
*>colour=20
*>      for ritual for both peoples was red. The virgin cow used in
the =
*>Hebrew=20
*>      ritual for purification was the forerunner of the red cattle
used =
*>by the=20
*>      Druids in their rituals.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>After the invasion of the Romans into
the =
*>Isles,=20
*>      white cattle were introduced and later used; until that time
red =
*>was the=20
*>      preferred colour. One of the most famous wars in Irish history
was =
*>over a=20
*>      Red Bull stolen by a northern Irish tribe. Also, swine were
not =
*>raised in=20
*>      any of the early Celtic areas until after they were introduced
by =
*>the=20
*>      Romans; the Celts had a taboo against them, along with
scaleless =
*>fish as=20
*>      eels and shellfish. The Celts, in similitude to the
Israelites, =
*>were=20
*>      excellent headsman and developed identifiable breeds of sheep,
=
*>cattle and=20
*>      horses, that carried on the traditions of the =
*>Israelites.</FONT></P>
*>      <P align=3Dcenter><B><FONT color=3D#000080>Other
Proofs</FONT></B> =
*></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>Perhaps one of the most telling of
the=20
*>      commonalities is simply the self-identification as Israelites
- =
*>the=20
*>      Hibernians - the name of the Irish and the Scots and the
Hebrides =
*>Islands=20
*>      off the coast of Scotland. The Milesians, one of the early
Celtic =
*>peoples=20
*>      to come to Ireland from Spain had a tradition that they were
of =
*>the Lost=20
*>      Tribes. The name Heber, Eber, or H'berian is found throughout
=
*>early=20
*>      literature to describe the Celts as they described themselves
to =
*>be "Of=20
*>      Eber" - the grandfather of Abraham.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>What I have presented here in greatly
=
*>abbreviated=20
*>      form just skims the surface of the commonalities between the =
*>Celtic=20
*>      Peoples and the Israelites. There is a tremendous amount of =
*>information=20
*>      available for those who would like to look at this closer =
*>themselves. A=20
*>      few resources are listed at the end. This is one of those
subjects =
*>in=20
*>      which at first one can say "oh - that's an interesting =
*>coincidence". But=20
*>      the sheer mass of these "coincidences" that build up after one
=
*>goes from=20
*>      discipline to another becomes totally overwhelming. The fact
that =
*>so much=20
*>      of the languages are similar almost three thousand years
later, =
*>that=20
*>      customs are clearly identifiable as being related, that
religious=20
*>      practices are uniquely similar and that the everyday
agricultural=20
*>      practices and crops were similar - all along with the many
other=20
*>      commonalities bespeak a common origin.</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>For those interested in pursuing this
I =
*>wish you=20
*>      well and much enjoyment.</FONT></P>
*>      <HR align=3Dleft>
*>
*>      <P align=3Dcenter><B><FONT color=3D#000080>Suggested
information=20
*>      sources:</FONT></B> </P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080><B>Manx Gaelic Society</B><BR>Yn =
*>Cheshaght=20
*>      Ghailckagh<BR>St Judes<BR>Isle of Man IM7 2EW<BR>United =
*>Kingdom</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080><B>Gaelic Books Council</B><BR>Dept
of=20
*>      Celtic<BR>University of Glasgow<BR>Glasgow G12 =
*>8QQ<BR>Scotland</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080><B>Yair Davidy</B><BR>Brit-Am<BR>PO
Box=20
*>      595<BR>Jerusalem<BR>Israel 91004</FONT></P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080><BR>Chadwick, N (1965) <I>Celtic =
*>Britain.</I>=20
*>      London.<BR>Chadwick, N (1970) <I>The Celts</I>. United =
*>Kingdom.<BR>Rankin,=20
*>      H (1987) <I>Celts and the Classical World</I>.
London.<BR>Squire, =
*>C (1905)=20
*>      <I>Celtic Myth and Legend, Poetry and Romance</I>. =
*>London.<BR>Squire, C=20
*>      (1909) <I>The Mythology of Ancient Britain and Ireland</I>.=20
*>      London.</FONT></P>
*>      <HR align=3Dleft>
*>
*>      <P><A=20
*>      =
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p1.html#Editorial"><=
*>FONT=20
*>      color=3D#000080>Editorial</FONT></A> </P>
*>      <P><FONT color=3D#000080>In Brief</FONT>
*>      <UL>
*>        <LI><A=20
*>        =
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p1.html#Cultural"><F=
*>ONT=20
*>        color=3D#000080>Cultural Links Between the Israelites and=20
*>        Myceneans</FONT></A> </LI>
*>        <LI><A=20
*>        =
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p1.html#Westminster"=
*>><FONT=20
*>        color=3D#000080>Westminster Abbey</FONT></A> </LI>
*>        <LI><A=20
*>        =
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p1.html#Elam"><FONT
=
*>
*>        color=3D#000080>Elam's Volatile Relationship with
Israelitish=20
*>        Nations</FONT></A> </LI>
*>        <LI><A=20
*>        =
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p1.html#Who"><FONT=20
*>        color=3D#000080>Who are the East Asians, Polynesians and =
*>American=20
*>        Indians?</FONT></A> </LI>
*>        <LI><A=20
*>        =
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p1.html#Ephraim"><FO=
*>NT=20
*>        color=3D#000080>Ephraim</FONT></A> </LI></UL>
*>      <P><A =
*>href=3D"http://cgca.net/coglinks/origin/oon2.1/vol2_1p2.html"><FONT=20
*>      color=3D#000080>The=20
*>Chaldeans</FONT></A></P></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV></BODY></HTML>
*>
*>------=_NextPart_000_004E_01C25191.5D636CE0--
*>




More information about the Neur-sci mailing list