Eric Hoffer Example

KP-PC k.p.collins at worldnet.att.net%remove%
Fri Apr 11 05:21:55 EST 2003


When I started out, the Longshoreman Philosopher, Eric Hoffer, was
one of my Heroes. I knew that I was setting out on a 'dangerous'
course by deciding to pursue an understanding of what was in the
published literature on my own - that, perhaps, I'd never bring
anything to fruition - but I'd been moved to "do something" by all
the suffering and animosities that I saw all around, and although it
was hard giving up the simple dreams I'd had for myself home &
Family - I could not not try.

All along, Mr. Hoffer's example stuck with me as sort of a reserve of
hope - if all else failed, to get 'picked up' by some University, as
Mr. Hoffer was because, like him, through years of following 'heart'
stuff, I had a few things to say that were worth hearing.

You know - a closet-sized office somewhere in the outer reaches of
some campus.

I never dreamed that a man could work, achieve some things, and
folks'd never respond [or respond only negatively].

I'll pay my way by doing Custodial work - scrub the hallways, paint
the walls, service campus vehicles, mow your grass, shovel snow, rake
leaves, wash dishes [and windows], move supplies, take care of your
databases, networks, or programming, put books back on the shelves in
your Libraries, stock and tidy up your labs, be a dorm resident -
anything that'll let me eat and have a roof, nearby your Library.

Is there no place on the face of the planet where the work I've done
in Neuroscience will be received?

You know - like Eric Hoffer's work was received - so that I can go
back through my archives, and work in your Library, quiet as a mouse,
to address every criticism that folks've stated.

I just want to work more - to not fail to do what needs to be done.

Is this 'impossible'?

Or is AoK is a book that must be banned before it's even published?

ken







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