more human experimentation and nonlethal weapons links

Allen L. Barker alb at datafilter.com
Fri Aug 1 17:43:24 EST 2003



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Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives
Bad trip to Edgewood:
US Army drug testing, television documentary archive, 1950-1992
Documentary programme
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/lhcma/cats/badtrip/xb10-01-.htm


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The Case Against ELECTROSHOCK TREATMENT.
http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1272/1998_Nov/54879231/print.jhtml
USA Today (Magazine)
Nov, 1998
Author/s: Jan Eastgate

[...]

Today, psychiatrist have reason to thank Cerletti for a financial
blessings that has showered them with riches at the press of a
button. The entire procedure takes just minutes to administer and
reaps about $3,000,000,000 a year for the psychiatric industry.

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) has estimated that more than
88,000 people are given electroshock each year in the U.S. However,
this is based on statistics that are more than 15 years old. It would
seem that psychiatrists have no desire to monitor their systematic
social crippling of tens of thousands of people annually. Newspaper
articles in 1993, for instance, put the number of Americans undergoing
ECT each year as high as 110,000.

How did electroshock, with no history of ever having done anybody any
good, become accepted in countries like the U.S. with "authoritative"
recognition? How was it that, as ECT continued to be used, the
procedure became "standard practice"?

[...]

Electroshock's use as a mean of control and torture was not limited
to Germany. An unnamed psychiatrists quoted in a 1951 Central
Intelligence Agency document stated that use of the lower setting of
the same model shock machine Alexander used could produce
"excruciating pain and that the individual would be quite willing to
give information if threatened with the use of this machine." In this
same document, the psychiatrist informed the CIA that a person "can be
reduced to the vegetable level" through the use of ECT.

During the 1950s, the CIA paid Canadian psychiatrists Donald Ewen
Cameron (president of both the World Psychiatric Association and APA)
$69,000 to conduct his "psychic driving" and "depatterning"
experiments as part of its mind control operation code-named
MK-ULTRA. A number of Cameron's victims were place into a drug-induced
stupor lasting up to 90 days while tape recorded messages were
played. In the procedure, also known as "deep sleep treatment" (DST),
patients were awakened two to three times every day for multiple
electroshock treatments. In October, 1988, the CIA settled with eight
individuals who had been experimented upon for $750,000. Joseph Rauh,
an attorney for the plaintiffs, said he hoped the case closed the door
on this type of experimentation happening again.

[...]

One explanation as to why psychiatrists ignore the evidence and
administer an estimated 260,000 shock treatments a year is offered by
Texas anesthesiologist Michael Chavin, who assisted with more than
2,000 electroshock procedures and then denounced it. "After 50 years
of practicing this hoax, psychiatrists are not likely to suddenly
agree that it is harmful. As soon as they do, they know there would be
a rush of criminal and civil suits from which they would never
recover."

Profit is another factor. Electric shock can increase a psychiatrist's
annual income by over $27,000 a year. Whether or not a person receives
electroshock seems to depend more on his insurance coverage than his
"mental health." This is seen in Texas, where 65-year-olds get 360%
more electric shock treatments than 64-year-olds. The difference is
that, at age 65, Medicare coverage takes effect.

[...]


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Not-so-deadly force: the search for a kinder, gentler knockout
punch.(development of nonlethal weapons for military and civilian use)
http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1200/n10_v153/20406307/print.jhtml
Science News
March 7, 1998
Author/s: Sid Perkins

[...]

A variety of sublethal weapons are available commercially and are
widely used by civilian law enforcement. However, the Department of
Defense is moving to develop a new generation of equipment. Its Joint
Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate, located at the Quantico Marine Corps
Base in Virginia, plans to spend around $17 million this year and
about $25 million for each of the next 7 years to study 14 sublethal
weapon technologies.

Many of these weapons could be ready for use in the next 2 to 5 years,
says Capt. Sean Gibson, a spokesperson at Quantico. Although some of
them will be similar to equipment already in stock, others could be
futuristic beam weapons akin to a Star Trek phaser.

[...]

The Navy wants to modify its remote-controlled Pioneer reconnaissance
drones for use in crowd control or dispersal. Engineers plan to equip
a device mounted on the drone with nonlethal pepper spray, tear gas,
or stingball grenades, to be dropped on crowds. Pilots now use the
device to eject metallic chaff and missile-decoying flares from
fighter aircraft.

Researchers are also investigating acoustical weapons that would use
low-frequency sound waves to nauseate and disorient an opponent, as
well as a pain-inducing beam, many details of which remain classified.

Other weapons would work against an opponent's equipment, including an
electromagnetic beam to fry a vehicle's electronics and a strong,
fast-curing polymer foam to gum up machinery or weapons.

In addition to its role in the development of these sublethal weapons,
the Quantico directorate serves as the Defense Department's
clearinghouse for related unclassified information. It works closely
with civilian law enforcement and with other government agencies, such
as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the
Department of Justice, which sponsor similar research.

In June 1996, DARPA funded the development of a 300-milliwatt,
hand-held green laser baton, informally known as a laser dazzler. The
first of these devices was delivered to the Department of Defense late
last month.

Similar in size and weight to a heavy-duty flashlight, the laser
dazzler is manufactured by LE Systems of Glastonbury, Conn., and can
be used for both military purposes and civilian law enforcement. Its
primary aim is to distract and disorient an adversary from a safe
distance, says Richard J. Nelson, a program manager with the company.

The laser dazzler--which causes no permanent damage, even if held
close to the eye, Nelson says--presents an impenetrable "optical wall"
to an opponent and is bright enough to be effective even in the
daytime. Random strobelike flickering of the laser adds to the
adversary's disorientation.

[...]


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War Without Death.(nonlethal weapons)
http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1511/4_20/54174544/print.jhtml
Discover
April, 1999
Author/s: Corey S. Powell

[...]

Weapons that cause only disabilities may nevertheless be considered
unacceptable if they lead to what Sapolsky calls "worse than lethal
outcomes." In the ethics of warfare, some strategists consider a
bullet through the brain better than permanent blindness or insanity
(so hallucinogenic drugs are ruled out).

[...]

In the realm of the really scary is a microwave gun under study at Oak
Ridge National Laboratory that raises body temperature, provoking a
debilitating fever. Just testing such a weapon raises safety issues,
so team leader Clay Easterly has created a virtual-human computer
model to "minimize the need for actual human subjects."


[...]


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"WHEN DID THE SIXTIES HAPPEN?" SEARCHING FOR NEW DIRECTIONS.
http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m2005/1_33/56027322/print.jhtml
Journal of Social History
Fall, 1999
Author/s: Andrew Hunt

[...]

Curiously, only a handful writers and academics have acknowledged the
devastating impact of the FBI's Counter-Intelligence Programs
(COINTELPRO) on political activism in general and the New Left in
particular. The few scholars who have studied COINTELPRO in any detail
generally agree that it did incalculable harm to radical political
movements in the sixties.(11) In Beyond the Barricades: The Sixties
Generation Grows Up, sociologists Jack Whalen and Richard Flacks
emphasized the role of authorities in repressing New Left
activities. The authors noted: "[The] FBI and other intelligence
agencies carried out programs of harassment and surveillance of
questionable legality. Such activities were widely publicized, and
ultimately a paralyzing paranoia spread throughout the youth and
student communities. Youths questioned whether the risk of extreme
physical danger was a reasonable price to pay for confrontation with
authority."(12)

[...]


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Germ War: The US Record
http://www.counterpunch.org/germwar.html

[...]

Savannah, Georgia and Avon Park, Florida were the targets of repeated
Army bio-weapons experiments in 1956 and 1957. Army CBW researchers
released millions of mosquitoes on the two towns in order to test the
ability of insects to carry and deliver yellow fever and dengue
fever. Hundreds of residents fell ill, suffering from fevers,
respiratory distress, stillbirths, encephalitis and typhoid. Army
researchers disguised themselves as public health workers in order
photograph and test the victims. Several deaths were reported.

[...]


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Vermont Senator Wants Study of Terror Link to West Nile Virus
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/13/politics/13VIRU.html?ex=1059710400&en=8bda6f76f64d0492&ei=5070


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-- 
Mind Control: TT&P ==> http://www.datafilter.com/mc
Home page: http://www.datafilter.com/alb
Allen Barker




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