Brain clues to attention disorder

k p Collins kpaulc at [----------]earthlink.net
Sun Dec 21 18:57:39 EST 2003


"Dave Bird" <dave at nospam.xemu.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:toIZvzBkQf5$Ew7J at xemu.demon.co.uk...
> In article<84da9680.0312211037.72881ab7 at posting.google.com>,
> orkeltatte at hotmail.com <orkeltatte at hotmail.com> writes:
> >Dave Bird <dave at nospam.xemu.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
> >news:<MdRByNADua5$EwsC
> >@xemu.demon.co.uk>...
> >> In article<84da9680.0312210247.4030f84b at posting.google.com>,
> >> orkeltatte at hotmail.com <orkeltatte at hotmail.com> writes:
> >> >> > [...]
> >> >> [...]
> >> > [...]
> >> [...]
> > [...]
> [...]
>
>  Well, yeah, something like that.  Stress effects
>  are what pushes down dopamine, and
>  noradrenaline comes up in response: the result
>  is that  the person seems impulsive and physically
>  active with little planning.
>
>  Support planning (dopamine) and things come
>  back into whack.

Not actually.

What's actually happening is that the innate balance
of a nervous system is being artificially upset, which
results in a generalized 'desynchronization' of nervous
system function, which occurs within the nervous system
as an increased information-processing workload, and
it's be-cause of this that external observables become
'quieted'.

The 'quieting' comes at 'two'-great-a-cost - literally, a
dumbing-down of innate nervous system functionality.

I'll post further discussion in reply to a previous post
of mine in this thread.

ken [k. p. collins]

> [...]






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