REM sleep EEG vs Beta wave EEG

Anomaly Magnetism magnetic-heat-sound at excite.com
Sun Jun 8 16:28:30 EST 2003


"KP_PC" <k.p.collins at worldnet.att.net> wrote in message news:<ZbKEa.192062$ja4.10275952 at bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>...
> "Anomaly Magnetism" <magnetic-heat-sound at excite.com> wrote in message
> news:3f3e2522.0306072240.2dc96f5f at posting.google.com...
> | "KP_PC" <k.p.collins at worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
>  news:<X5qEa.113921$cO3.8350592 at bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>...
> | > "Anomaly Magnetism" <magnetic-heat-sound at excite.com> wrote in
>  message
> | > news:3f3e2522.0306062201.322fdcbc at posting.google.com...
> | > | [...]
>  
> | I am still confused over why a relatively
> | relaxed state of the brain (REM sleep)
> | would have a higher frequency than a
> | more intense state (beta wave). So how
> | does this work?
> 
> Basically, I explained it in my previous post.
> 
> During 'sleep', the brain is actively performing
> information-processing work.
> 
> It's =not= 'relaxed'.

Okay is isn't relaxed. However is less active than during
'wakefuleness' and intense concentration. Right?



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