Sundowning: severe dementia and bringing on the night (weird case)

Collie bordercollie at whatfun.com
Mon Mar 31 07:34:57 EST 2003


John H. wrote:
> 
> Reminds me of an old case I read in a layman's classic called "Brain Repair"
> (layman because non-technical but bloody good read).
> 
> A chap fluent in French and German suffered a stroke and lost the ability to
> speak German, his natural language. However, he could still speak French.
> The only reasons the docs could establish was that at the time the man was
> in a deep love affair with a French woman!

I worked with a man post-brain injury who had spoken both Dutch and
English prior to the injury (his first language was Dutch; he moved to
the USA when he was 7 years old and quickly learned English).  During
his initial recovery period, he spoke and understood only Dutch.  He
then progressed to understanding English and speaking it with a thick
Dutch accent.  From there he progressed to speaking English as he had
immediately prior to his accident, with a thick New Jersey accent!



> 
> John H.
> "Larry Brash" <lbrash at ozemail.com.au> wrote in message
> news:3E86B47A.76F8943E at ozemail.com.au...
> > "John H." wrote:
> > >
> > > 30/03/03 6:13pm
> > >
> > > An unusual case of sundown syndrome subsequent to a traumatic head
> injury.
> > >   Duckett S Brain Inj 1992 Mar-Apr 6:189-91
> > >
> > > BROWSE: Brain Inj
> > > Abstract
> > > An unusual case of sundown syndrome is here reported, in which a
> bilingual
> > > patient would involuntarily change languages at sunset.
> >
> > Fascinating...
> >
> > More mundanely, I recall a dementing patient of German origin losing his
> > ability to speak English one week prior to admission. It never returned,
> > of course.
> >
> > --
> > Larry Brash




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