Sundowning: severe dementia and bringing on the night (weird case)

KP-PC k.p.collins at worldnet.att.net%remove%
Mon Mar 31 17:26:22 EST 2003


"Collie" <bordercollie at whatfun.com> wrote in message
news:3E8835F1.73F4 at whatfun.com...
| John H. wrote:
| >
| > Reminds me of an old case I read in a layman's classic called
"Brain Repair"
| > (layman because non-technical but bloody good read).
| >
| > A chap fluent in French and German suffered a stroke and lost the
ability to
| > speak German, his natural language. However, he could still speak
French.
| > The only reasons the docs could establish was that at the time
the man was
| > in a deep love affair with a French woman!
|
| I worked with a man post-brain injury who had spoken both Dutch and
| English prior to the injury (his first language was Dutch; he moved
to
| the USA when he was 7 years old and quickly learned English).
During
| his initial recovery period, he spoke and understood only Dutch.
He
| then progressed to understanding English and speaking it with a
thick
| Dutch accent.  From there he progressed to speaking English as he
had
| immediately prior to his accident, with a thick New Jersey accent!

HURRAH! This's a case that clearly exposes the TD E/I-minimization
'hierarchy' with respect to the "continuum of relative familiarities"
[AoK, Ap4] - in recovery, this patient's external observables
'strided the continuum of relative familiarities' as his nervous
system worked to achieve TD E/I-minimization, the behavioral
progression 'walked' the TD E/I-minimization hierarchy ["tree"] from
"trunk-stuff" to "leaf-stuff", with the formerly-most-TD
E/I-minimized stuff becoming the first post-trauma TD E/I-minimized
stuff, and so forth, with respect to the formerly-converged-upon TD
E/I-minimization hierarchy.

This example also points directly to optimal treatment strategies -
don't focus upon acting to re-establish capacities correlated to the
'moment' before the trauma occurred. Rather, focus upon assisting
with TD E/I-minimization with respect to old, long-'familiar'
[reiteratively-TD E/I-minimized ["`tree'-trunk"] stuff - use
pre-existing the "biological mass" [AoK, Ap5] and its correlated
"behavioral inertia" as 'template' for the guiding of post-trauma
recovery. [This, of course, has the prerequisite of comprehending
what "biological mass" and "behavioral inertia" are, and how and why
they arise during the course of 'normal' nervous system functioning.]

[All of this stuff [all the hows and whys] has [have] also been in
AoK all along.]

Thank you for posting this Brilliantly-informative example, Collie.

Cheers, Collie, ken

| >
| > John H.
| > "Larry Brash" <lbrash at ozemail.com.au> wrote in message
| > news:3E86B47A.76F8943E at ozemail.com.au...
| > > "John H." wrote:
| > > >
| > > > 30/03/03 6:13pm
| > > >
| > > > An unusual case of sundown syndrome subsequent to a traumatic
head
| > injury.
| > > >   Duckett S Brain Inj 1992 Mar-Apr 6:189-91
| > > >
| > > > BROWSE: Brain Inj
| > > > Abstract
| > > > An unusual case of sundown syndrome is here reported, in
which a
| > bilingual
| > > > patient would involuntarily change languages at sunset.
| > >
| > > Fascinating...
| > >
| > > More mundanely, I recall a dementing patient of German origin
losing his
| > > ability to speak English one week prior to admission. It never
returned,
| > > of course.
| > >
| > > --
| > > Larry Brash
|





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