Mobiles 'make you senile'

Charlie Wilkes charlie_wilkes at easynews.com
Sun Sep 14 14:01:13 EST 2003


On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 05:59:54 GMT, "torresD" <torresD30 at hotmail.com>
wrote:

>
>The study - which warns specifically against
> "the intense use of mobile phones by youngsters" -
>comes as research on their health effects is
> being scaled down, due to industry pressure.
>
>http://news.independent.co.uk/world/science_medical/story.jsp?story=443248
>Mobiles 'make you senile'
>By Geoffrey Lean, Environment Editor.
>14 September 2003
>
>
>Mobile phones and the new wireless technology
>could cause a "whole generation" of today's
>teenagers to go senile in the prime of their lives,
>new research suggests
>
>The study - which warns specifically against
> "the intense use of mobile phones by youngsters" -
>comes as research on their health effects is
> being scaled down, due to industry pressure.
>
>It is likely to galvanise concern about the almost
>universal exposure to microwaves in Western
>countries, by revealing a new way in which they
>may seriously damage health.
>
>Professor Leif Salford, who headed the research at Sweden's prestigious Lund
>University, says "the voluntary exposure of the brain to microwaves from
>hand-held mobile phones" is "the largest human biological experiment ever".
>And he is concerned that, as new wireless technology spreads, people may
>"drown in a sea of microwaves".
>
>The study - financed by the Swedish Council for Work Life Research, and
>published by the US government's National Institute of Environmental Health
>Sciences - breaks new ground by looking at how low levels of microwaves
>cause proteins to leak across the blood-brain barrier.
>
>Previous concerns about mobile phones have concentrated on the possibility
>that the devices may heat the brain, or cause cancer. But the heating is
>thought to be too minor to have an effect and hundreds of cancer studies
>have been inconclusive.
>
>As a result, the US mobile phone industry has succeeded in cutting research
>into the health effects, and the World Health Organisation is unlikely to
>continue its studies.
>
>Mays Swicord, a scientific adviser to Motorola told New Scientist magazine
>that governments and industry should "stop wasting money" by looking for
>health damage.
>
>But Professor Salford and his team have spent 15 years investigating a
>different threat. Their previous studies proved radiation could open the
>blood-brain barrier, allowing a protein called albumin to pass into the
>brain. Their latest work goes a step further, by showing the process is
>linked to serious brain damage. Professor Salford said the long-term effects
>were not proven, and that it was possible the neurons would repair
>themselves in time. But, he said, neurons that would normally not become
>"senile" until people reached their 60s may now do so when they were in
>their 30s.
>
>He says he deliberately refrained from publicising his work to avoid alarm,
>and acknowledges that mobile phones can save lives.
>   14 September 2003 01:54
>
This is pernicious cargo-cult science!

Charlie



More information about the Neur-sci mailing list